topic

Making cultures

From sending gifts and cassette tapes of news to loved ones to producing visual, written, aural, and performing arts, “making cultures” reflects the enormous diversity of everyday, exceptional creation that Filipinos in the Philippines and its diaspora undertake to make sense of and comment upon their conditions. These scholarly and creative works indicate both the range of ways in which Filipinos make culture and the intensity with which they engage it.

 

As they go about the daily culture-making of getting to and from work, taking care of themselves and others, eating and being, Filipinos also make cultures by writing, painting, sculpting, performing, by intervening in and disrupting their erasure with their presence. These latter, more familiar modes of making culture draw on Filipinos' ongoing experiences of imperial history, global movement, labor, and encounter. The range of responses and intersections between the works gathered here further indicates the intensity and vitality with which Filipinos and others engage with the process and meaning of making cultures.

 

By recognizing these activities as a formal topic, CA+T underscores that making cultures is just as much a form of labor, albeit frequently unrecognized and unpaid, as the more formalized work that drives much of Filipinos’ global migration.

SPAM/MAPS: World

Michael Arcega

2001 Spam luncheon meat and pins 36 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Michael Arcega

Michael Arcega is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily in sculpture and installation. Though visual, his art revolves largely around language. Directly informed by historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, his subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

Michael has a B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute and an M.F.A. from Stanford University. His work has been exhibited at venues including the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, the de Young Museum in San Francisco, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Orange County Museum of Art, the Contemporary Museum in Honolulu, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Cue Arts Foundation, and the Asia Society in New York among many others. He was recently awarded a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship in Fine Arts. Michael is currently a Resident Fellow at Bemis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, Nebraska.

As an interdisciplinary artist working in sculpture and installation, my work revolves largely around language and research. Directly informed by Historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, my subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

I seek out cultural and historic markers embedded in objects, food, architecture, visual lexicons, and vernacular languages. For instance, vernacular Tagalog is infused with Spanish and English words, lending itself to verbal mutation. This malleability results in wordplay and jokes that transform words like Persuading to First Wedding, Tenacious to Tennis Shoes, and Masturbation to Mass Starvation. As a "Naturalized American," my practice draws from the sensibility of the insider and outsider-- making work from a constantly shifting position.

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  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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SPAM/MAPS: World (detail)

Michael Arcega

2001 Spam luncheon meat and pins 36 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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X

Michael Arcega

Michael Arcega is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily in sculpture and installation. Though visual, his art revolves largely around language. Directly informed by historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, his subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

Michael has a B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute and an M.F.A. from Stanford University. His work has been exhibited at venues including the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, the de Young Museum in San Francisco, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Orange County Museum of Art, the Contemporary Museum in Honolulu, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Cue Arts Foundation, and the Asia Society in New York among many others. He was recently awarded a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship in Fine Arts. Michael is currently a Resident Fellow at Bemis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, Nebraska.

As an interdisciplinary artist working in sculpture and installation, my work revolves largely around language and research. Directly informed by Historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, my subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

I seek out cultural and historic markers embedded in objects, food, architecture, visual lexicons, and vernacular languages. For instance, vernacular Tagalog is infused with Spanish and English words, lending itself to verbal mutation. This malleability results in wordplay and jokes that transform words like Persuading to First Wedding, Tenacious to Tennis Shoes, and Masturbation to Mass Starvation. As a "Naturalized American," my practice draws from the sensibility of the insider and outsider-- making work from a constantly shifting position.

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  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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SPAM/MAPS: World (detail)

Michael Arcega

2001 Spam luncheon meat and pins 36 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of the artist.

contributor

X

Michael Arcega

Michael Arcega is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily in sculpture and installation. Though visual, his art revolves largely around language. Directly informed by historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, his subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

Michael has a B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute and an M.F.A. from Stanford University. His work has been exhibited at venues including the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, the de Young Museum in San Francisco, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Orange County Museum of Art, the Contemporary Museum in Honolulu, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Cue Arts Foundation, and the Asia Society in New York among many others. He was recently awarded a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship in Fine Arts. Michael is currently a Resident Fellow at Bemis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, Nebraska.

As an interdisciplinary artist working in sculpture and installation, my work revolves largely around language and research. Directly informed by Historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, my subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

I seek out cultural and historic markers embedded in objects, food, architecture, visual lexicons, and vernacular languages. For instance, vernacular Tagalog is infused with Spanish and English words, lending itself to verbal mutation. This malleability results in wordplay and jokes that transform words like Persuading to First Wedding, Tenacious to Tennis Shoes, and Masturbation to Mass Starvation. As a "Naturalized American," my practice draws from the sensibility of the insider and outsider-- making work from a constantly shifting position.

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X
  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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SPAM/MAPS: World Red

Michael Arcega

2001 Spam luncheon meat and pins on a painted wall 36 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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X

Michael Arcega

Michael Arcega is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily in sculpture and installation. Though visual, his art revolves largely around language. Directly informed by historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, his subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

Michael has a B.F.A. from the San Francisco Art Institute and an M.F.A. from Stanford University. His work has been exhibited at venues including the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego, the de Young Museum in San Francisco, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Orange County Museum of Art, the Contemporary Museum in Honolulu, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Cue Arts Foundation, and the Asia Society in New York among many others. He was recently awarded a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship in Fine Arts. Michael is currently a Resident Fellow at Bemis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, Nebraska.

As an interdisciplinary artist working in sculpture and installation, my work revolves largely around language and research. Directly informed by Historic events, material significance, and the format of jokes, my subject matter deals with sociopolitical circumstances where power relations are unbalanced.

I seek out cultural and historic markers embedded in objects, food, architecture, visual lexicons, and vernacular languages. For instance, vernacular Tagalog is infused with Spanish and English words, lending itself to verbal mutation. This malleability results in wordplay and jokes that transform words like Persuading to First Wedding, Tenacious to Tennis Shoes, and Masturbation to Mass Starvation. As a "Naturalized American," my practice draws from the sensibility of the insider and outsider-- making work from a constantly shifting position.

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  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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Ta, Too Project 01

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
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Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

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  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

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Ta, Too Project 03

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
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Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

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  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

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Ta, Too Project 04

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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X

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
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Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

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  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

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The Brick Oven

DeNNiSOmeRa

2012 Poem. Courtesy of the author.

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DeNNiSOmeRa

b. Year of the Snake/US ImmigratioNationality Act
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Practicing pokin'wordsplayw/pinch/punch of performancEa®thistor/y on and off the page, in and out of his mindbody, DeNNiSOmeRa is a writerliPOethink®, nEOnotsoPOst.©o.lOnial FOet/schola®©tivisavista, FOst.©o.lOnial FOetal.

Born in Baguio City, Benguet Province, Luzon Island on the archipelago known in the second language of its colonization as the Philippines, Dennis emigrated in his mother's lap to the US when he was eleven months old. He grew up His growth wa s tunted in the intolerance/ignorance of Sacramento, CA, the larger US misrepresentations and omissions of Asian/Pilipino-American from literature, history, media, and authority/leadershiPositions. Eventually he was borne by the ink and movement of the pen on page then toncescreened through keyboard, the act of writing performing his ontology through and in spite of WEstern eUrocentric olonialimperial assimilationist, objectifying, appropriative logics.

After graduating from UCSanta Cruz, then migrating to San FranciscOakland where he worked with youth for several years, he returned to the Philippines (and Southeast Asia) for the firstime since his i'mmigration. At an aRts festival in his birthplace, he participated in poetry and video workshops. After nine months in the Philippines and three traveling in Southeast Asia, he returned to the US, where he continued to grow his writing & performancEa® th r ough workshops, open mics and performance opportunities back in the SF Bay Area via June Jordan's Poetry for the People at UCBerkeley, Glide Memorial Church and the Mission Cultural Center in SF, the Ohana Open Mic in Oakland, Kearny Street Workshop in SF and a PilipinoAM theater based in SF, SOMA's Bindlestiff Studios.

Following a year at California College of Arts and Crafts, he found Mills College in Oakland to be the place where his thoroughandling of language were most at home. Through Mills, he not only refined a praxis of experimentaLANGUAGE writing to represent his thoughts poetically in the M.F.A.––but also during performance collaborations w/experimental musicians and dancers in/out of his mindbody––he continUed to further the process and perFORMance of language beyond the page: sowing seeds for his present pursuit of a Ph.D. in Performance Studies at UCDavis. Dennis' writing has been published online and off in poetry journals Tinfish, Chain, Cricket Online Review, Bay Poetics, POMPOM, 2nd Avenue Poetry, Deep Oakland. His morecent wordsplaying has been focused just off screen in a film narration performance called movietelling(Lew)/Katsuben (a silent film era Japanese form(oreso the Korean Pyonsa who subverted Japanese propaganda films in their colonial era there), performing his mov[i.e.]telling work nationally in NYC, Miami, Oakland SF.

My current aRtisticreati've work is a poeticritical illumination of the colonialimperial/patriarchal inscription on the mindbody through poeticritical archi“text”uralandscapes–––primarily revisioning in the form of mov[i.e.]telling/Katsuben: a Japanese form of film narration from the silent film era; he better identifies with the Korean film narrators called Pyonsa who subverted Japanese colonial propaganda films in their colonial era there.

Through a nEOnotsOpoOst©olOnialense, my critical work and research attends to persistent assimilative logics, objectificational representation practices and intellectual appropriations in settler hegemonicolonial culture perpetuating continued epistemicolonial violences––stemming from WEstern civilization'self-constitution as the repression and projection of its disowned savage/barbarian/heathen on all Others and continUed consolidation through persistent un/conscioUS EUrasing t/races of Others and the EUrasure of thesEUrasures–––and the critical/theoretical and comparative gestures in hybridiasporic poetics by intellectuals and writers of the "missing passage", specifically around the tropes of utterance, speech, the tongue, languagetc. as constant and continued DEcolonizingeMpoweresponses to, aswellasymptoms of a continuing white WEsterneUrocentric hegemonicolonial state.

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  • Born: Baguio City, Philippines
  • Based: Oakland, CA, USA
  • Also Based in: Baguio City, Philippines
    San Francisco, CA, USA

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The Head Is the Best Part/ September 29, 2013

Elaine Castillo

Sep 29, 2013 Video. 8 min 56 sec Courtesy of the artist.

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Elaine Castillo

b. 1984
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Elaine Castillo was born in the San Francisco Bay Area and currently lives in southeast London. Her writing can be found or is forthcoming at make/shift magazine, The Rumpus, [PANK] Magazine and Feminist Review, among others. She is also a board member of Digital Desperados, a Glasgow-based film collective for women of color. At the end of March, one of her short films was screened at The Future Weird, a Brooklyn-based film series run by Derica Shields and Megan Eardly, devoted to films exploring non-Western futurisms. She is currently at work on a novel, A Filipineia.

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  • Born: San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Based: London, England, UK
  • Also Based in: San Francisco, CA, USA

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Enrique G. Oracion, Ph.D.

b. 1960
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Born in 1960, in a farming community in Bayawan City, Negros Oriental in central Philippines, I was exposed early to the realities of country life and environmental problems that push poor people to migrate or to move to places they believe can offer them a better life. This exposure may have eventually inspired me to take a degree that deals with human and societal issues and problems. In 1989, after I got married, I moved to Dumaguete City, the capital city of Negros Oriental, and permanently settled here with my family of procreation. I currently work at Silliman University in Dumaguete City as anthropology professor and Research Director.

I earned my Bachelor of Arts degree major in Sociology as a library assistant and an academic scholar in Silliman University. Immediately after completing my baccalaureate degree in 1980, I enrolled in the Master's Program in Sociology through a work-study grant from the same university and graduated in 1984. My thesis focused on a spatio-temporal analysis of the socioeconomic adaptation of the Negritos, one of the indigenous peoples in Negros Oriental, to environmental changes in the uplands of the province where they have been settled for centuries.

After I completed my Master of Arts degree in Sociology, I concentrated on teaching, both in the secondary and tertiary levels, and research until I decided to pursue my doctorate in the Anthropology program at the University of San Carlos in Cebu City. I completed the degree in 2006. My dissertation examined the cultural and local politics of marine protected area management in one coastal municipality in Negros Oriental, which has become a popular dive tourism destination because of its marine biodiversity.

My academic preparation in Sociology, commonly associated with quantitative research, and in Anthropology, recognized for its ethnographic research techniques, has provided me a better grasp of interdisciplinary perspectives on doing research. Anchored in gender and environmental issues and frameworks of analysis, my research interests are varied and include the role of women in resource management and reproductive health, the human dimensions of environmental management, environmental anthropology and ecotourism, cultural and natural heritage management, and service-learning and environmental interventions.

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  • Born: Bayawan City, Negros Oriental, Philippines
  • Based: Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental, Philippines

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