topic

Genders and sexualities

In “The Filipina's Breast: Savagery, Docility and the Erotics of the American Empire,” Nerissa Balce powerfully argues that “the bare brown bosoms of indigenous women were markers of savagery, colonial desire, and a justification for Western imperial rule. A foundational project of European and American imperialisms was the creation of an archive of images of the non-Western other whose inferiority was marked by female nakedness” (Social Text 24.2 [Summer 2006], 89).


These gendered, sexualized, racialized images conflated women and land as imperial possessions and legitimated US (and previously Spanish and Japanese) civilizing missions. Nor was this representation limited to women: Filipino men—albeit according to different tropes—were also archived by empire as gendered, sexualized and racialized objects.


In taking “genders and sexualities” as a topic, we gesture towards not only the complications of contemporary negotiations and constructions of “masculinity,” “femininity,” “heterosexuality,” “homosexuality” and their many local and global iterations but also to their inevitable entanglement with the histories of colonialism, imperialism, militarization, globalization and capitalism.

Breakfast in Bed

Kenneth Tam

2016 HD video, color, sound, 32 minutes Installation view Courtesy of the artist

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Kenneth Tam

b. 1982

Kenneth Tam is an artist who uses sculpture and video to explore his interests, which include Abercrombie and Fitch, public restrooms, and the films of Tsai Ming-Liang. He recently had a solo show at Night Gallery in 2013, and he was a recipient of an Art Matters Grant the same year.

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  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

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Confessional

Jeffrey Augustine Songco

2014 Digital print 30 in. x 12.5 in. CA+T Commissioned Work

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Jeffrey Augustine Songco

b. 1983
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Jeffrey Augustine Songco is a multi-media artist. Born and raised in New Jersey, USA, to immigrant Filipino parents, his artistic identity developed at a young age with training in classical ballet, voice, and musical theater. Today, he uses these disciplines in the performing arts to produce stories as works of visual art. He holds a B.F.A. from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.F.A. from San Francisco Art Institute. He has exhibited throughout the United States, including the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts in Grand Rapids. His writings have appeared in Art21 Blog, Bad at Sports, The Huffington Post, and Hyperallergic. He would like to be the US representative to the 2023 Venice Biennale. He currently lives and works in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

My obsessive consumption of superficial goods translates into the production of peculiar appropriation. There’s a lot of stuff out there to play with — things (as objects) and ideas (as language) are my materials. I'm interested in physical behavior, emotional narratives, and performed identities. I believe my artwork produces an infectious feeling of anxiety that can only be alleviated by a) the acceptance of the fluidity of meaning, 2) the impossibility of fully comprehending the absurd, and d) the inability to control your own laughter.

As the commissioned artist for the Center for Art and Thought’s exhibition Queer Sites and Sounds, I created a limited edition digital print titled Confessional. This work is the third iteration in a series of photographic prints depicting my “bag head character” juxtaposed with text from a grand narrative.

In 2012, I wrote my first screenplay titled The Host. The title refers to the protagonist – a white, affluent, suburban mom who is the beloved host on a popular home-shopping television network. The title also refers to the bread that is transformed into the body of Christ and eaten during Catholic mass. Throughout the film, the woman is negotiating her identity as a devout Catholic woman and as a mom to her recently outed college-aged son. In front of a million television viewers, she goes through her own transformation, performing a role that caters to a culturally conservative America, while knowing full well that her gay son is quietly shifting her away from those values. When I wrote the screenplay, I was just a writer with a dream, but I was also an artist with a camera. I created the triptych Hosanna as a way to visually manifest the text of The Host. In Hosanna, quotations from The Host flank the solitary white figure that is performing the role of the host. “Hosanna” is a biblical word that is shouted to express joy and adoration – an old-timer word for “OMG” or a phrase a woman might say when she sees sparkling jewelry.

By dressing in all white and placing a bag on my head, I enact a queer performance of the protagonist – a beautiful and empowered heterosexual white woman with personal anxiety that looms around her as she fulfills her own performance of self. This same concept can be used with the next iteration in the series, the diptych God Bless (Miss) America. I didn’t write a screenplay, but I’ve always been transfixed by pageantry – count me in as part of the demographic obsessed with TLC’s Toddlers and Tiaras who can also tell the difference between the Miss America and Miss USA pageants. The narrative of beauty pageants is so common in American popular culture that it has become a cliché, so I chose to use a clichéd question as the text within the artwork. In front of millions of television viewers, a pageant contestant must answer a seemingly bleak question with something that caters to the pageant judges and, ultimately, the identity of the nation.

I’m currently in the process of writing a screenplay titled The Cast, a dramatic film that focuses on a cast member of a reality television show about five affluent white married women living in San Francisco. Queer Sites and Sounds is the perfect site to visually translate the text of The Cast like I had done with The Host. My new artwork is titled Confessional, which refers to the idea of the Catholic Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation. Sharing and confessing sins to a priest in a small room allows the sinner to be absolved from mortal sins and avoid Hell. Decades ago, the word “confessional” was introduced to reality television when subjects of the show were taken aside from the main activity into a small room, and asked to share and confess how they felt about the events that just occurred. Subjects broke the fourth wall and spoke directly to the camera to share all their feelings and provide a proper narrative to the plot. The confessional has aesthetically evolved into what it is today, with the confessional interview being highly stylized and elaborately produced. Bravo Television’s The Real Housewives series provides fantastic examples of stylized confessionals, with characters confessing in front of luxurious backgrounds.

I’ve always had an interest in – some would say obsession with – white people. While I shine the spotlight on an American ideal, I don’t deny the multiple references to a darker side of white America: Christian extremism, political nationalism, military torture, and white supremacy. In Confessional, I chose to display a quotation that revealed a dramatic side of the reality show – adultery. This kind of saturated American identity is the root of my bag head character, which ultimately plays the role of an anonymous white person subject to the projections of any given story.

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  • Born: New Jersey, USA
  • Based: Grand Rapids, MI

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Dad's Garage

Ronaldo Wilson

2012 Digital recording of spoken word Duration: 9m 15s Material courtesy of Ronaldo Wilson

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Ronaldo Wilson

b. 1970

Born in Millington, TN, a Navy Base. Googled the city. There’s a photo on the Wikipedia page of Woodstock Elementary, which flashed me back to being in the driveway that wraps around the school to a small white boy in glasses, on the back of a his mom’s bike in a baby seat, little boys, me among them, hurling epithets at him: “Hey Googly-Eyes” or “Four-Eyed-Freak!” Such is the tension in my now happy obsession with reading glasses: 20/20 otherwise, but let me say, that as I look back, his eyes point to the kind of man I like to see, now. 
 
To Guam, over a few years, Military Zones, Officers, Blue Angels, and there, filling the scooped holes in the sand— a few beats away from the Mariana Trench—with liquid wax, sticking wicks in them, letting the “candles” cool with the class.  Lunch: A Hamburger wrapped in Aluminum Foil, Ketchup.
 
Back to Millington.  Playing in a tree house.  My desire then, to climb up it, and to stare.  Eat, boiled hotdogs.  Up there, cicada shells.  The trucks in the Tennessian Summer spout pesticides.
 
My mother upholstered the inside of a Ford Pinto station wagon, and we left for Alameda, CA. Slept at Rest Stops and Motels.  Dad let us steer.
 
In California, I learned the body is made up of salt water, mostly, and I’d fish in the Bay, and I watched one Perch on a hook dance to its death.
 
Sacramento, one boy I know from high school was shot in the head, left dead near the river.  Science, Beakers.  Drove a Volkswagen Scirocco.  Cal, Berkeley, the wagging tongue of a pervert wanting to meet in Dwinelle. His running shorts, see through.
 
Candy, my alter-ego from Jr. High to High School, even at home from college.  Lots of Phone Sex—learned the ropes of a conceptual notion of race & being this way, to be an imagined girl, to get old men to fall in love with me, her, to get off, and to vanish from any direct history of the self by hanging up.
 
I am a fish and love to swim, do yoga, and play tennis—I sought and seek fluidity.  NY, CA, NY, CA.  I ricocheted for many years back and forth, lovers, love, DALLAS, still do, my partner, my love – we had a cat that we borrowed, until it died by a car hit.  A film is being made about it in which I’m Pudgy.  I try to keep the fat off and sweat a lot
 
In NY, in an M.F.A. program at New York University, late nights at S/M Clubs in the then-Meat Packing District, Street Tranny Queens, Banjee Boys, working on my earliest “real” poems, or the poetry as point of view—freak wants to suck cocaine off my cock in a Dungeon, waves of men. Hotel-Tea-Rooms, anywhere, but started a PhD at City University of New York Graduate Center, and finished it, in three states, over 13 years, on 20th Century and Contemporary Black Poetics, Poetry, and Visual Culture, and I am now, currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Literature at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
 
Before that, I taught at Mount Holyoke College in MA.  Six years of cutting my teeth, tone, and vision between the poem and the critical essay, led me to complete my poems and the life in which it all began to COLLECT—
 
My first book, winner of the Cave Canem Prize, Narrative of the Life of the Brown Boy and the White Man (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2008), is a series of prose poems that captures the interrelationship of the two central characters, looking into their psyches and thoughts of race, class, and identity: Black, Asian, and Queer, who travels through dreams, city streets, gyms, porn theaters, beaches, ferries, familial memories and landscapes.
 
My second book, Poems of the Black Object (2009), winner of the Thom Gunn Award in Gay Poetry and an Asian American Literary Award in Poetry, contains works that slip between poem and essay, theory and epistle, revealing even more ways back into the fluid world, offering ways to make even more elastic yet still sharply pointed questions around and through race, sexuality, and desire.

Central to my research and an influence in my poetry, the visual artist Ellen Gallagher points out that “black bodies” have been “materially and physically constricted.” However, for Gallagher, “being doesn’t only exist inside the body.” As she puts it, “this is not a slave narrative. It’s after the explosion. The fracture has already happened.”  The opening lines of Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem, “Boy Breaking Glass,” help to illustrate this point, as the speaker decries: “I shall create! If not a note, a hole,/ If not an overture, a desecration.”
 
It is in the after-the-fracture field, far from the realm of the poem, in the realm of the black body and its insistent constriction and desecration, where the radical form of the poem occurs. To write poems and to write about African American poetry and visual art is to mediate one’s self-construction within the explosion and after the fracture.
 
The intersection is fluid, where my eyes are not infected.  I am allergic, these days, so much. The red you see is rage. Steroid drops abate.  There is a battle, inside, and it is violent.  There is a battle and I am giving you, fluid.  Pushed, I stretch out to hit the ball, the head speed of my racket is quick—the ball will spin away from you. I am an object revolving through race, sex, and desire, native and other to Black/Asian/Queer. I live between Santa Cruz, CA. and Long Island, NY, and I often let go, after going off, posing with jawbone in mind. 
 
A coming book, Farther Traveler: Poetry, Prose, Other is framed by a father’s dementia, a vehicle through which to explore racial and sexual violence, trauma and pleasure through multiple forms, from the sonnet to the journal, free verse poem to the lyric essay, to original ink and watercolor portraits. I slip outside of myself. Another, Lucy 72, originally seventy-two poems written in long, loosely structured couplets, are now honed down but still in couplets, to reveal a fluid narrative perspective that explores race, sexuality and representation both within the field of my imagination and, simultaneously, in my observations and analyses of my experiences in artist colonies.
 
As a poet, critic, and artist, I explore various conceptual possibilities that extend beyond the poem into expanding notions of poetics and critical inquiry across multiple mediums.  I have also been engaged in a solo multimedia project, Off the Dome: Rants, Raps and Meditations. These soundscapes, also at once a discrete album, are inspired by freestyle rap and performance art, combine totally improvised, original poetry captured on my iPhone, documented while jogging on the beach, dancing, practicing yoga, sitting in cafés or restaurants that vocalize interrogations of representation, selfhood, and place. To be free.
 
I’ve studied with many poets: June Jordan, Ishmael Reed, Yusef Komunyakka, Sharon Olds, Galway Kinnell, David Rivard, Cornelius Eady, Toi Derricotte, Allen Ginsburg, Gwendolyn Brooks, Myung Mi Kim. I've also studied wih many critics -  Barbara Christian, Alfred Arteaga, Michele Wallace - and those who’ve helped me to work between poetry and criticism - Eve Sedgwick, Meena Alexander, and Wayne Koestenbaum.
 
I’ve also been influenced by peers and mentors: Dawn Lundy Martin, Duriel E. Harris, Khary Polk, Wesley Yu, Iyko Day, Torkwase Dyson, M. Nourbese Philip, John Keene, giovanni singleton, Tisa Bryant, Erica Hunt, and many others whose work, conversations, and often collaborations have fueled my engagement with poetry, language, and art. 
 
Out of books, I stared at water, the brown slick of the Mississippi River, then the wide beaches in Guam. Overlooking cliffs, I lived near the Mariana Trench, Navy brat, playing on playgrounds made of land-bound Navy ships, a submarine buried in a field, the sleek surface of a copper plaque that marks memory.  
 
What keeps me a poet arises when I swim, today, in the resort pool, stretching, my back loose, fingers curled then opening, hands cutting below, my arms dart forward and release. This movement twins my backhands yesterday: my left hand pulling back the racket’s throat, like a bow and arrow before I make contact, the arms wing out, my chest opens.  How I strike the water is how I hit the ball—almost unconsciously—I enter the poem through its motion, time and space. 
 

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  • Born: Millington, TN, USA
  • Based: Santa Cruz, CA, USA
  • Also Based in: Port Jefferson Station, NY, USA

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Eve's Mistress

Angela Peñaredondo

2016 Digital video recording Duration: 1m 11s Courtesy of the artist

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Angela Peñaredondo

b. 1979

Born in Iloilo City, Philippines, Angela Peñaredondo is a Pilipinx poet and artist (on other days, she identifies as a usual ghost, subdued comet, or part-time animal). Her first full-length book, All Things Lose Thousands of Times (Inlandia Institute, 2016) is the winner of the Hillary Gravendyk Poetry Prize. She is the author of a chapbook, Maroon (Jamii Publications, 2015). Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in AAWW’s The Margins, Four Way Review, Cream City Review, Southern Humanities Review, South Dakota Review, Dusie and elsewhere. She is a VONA/Voices of our Nations Art fellow as well as a recipient of a University of California Institute for Research in the Arts Grant, the Gluck Program of the Arts Fellowship, Naropa University’s Zora Neal Hurston Award, Squaw Valley Writers Fellowship, and Fishtrap Fellowship. She has received scholarships from Tin House, Split This Rock, Dzanc Books' International Literary Program, and others.

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  • Born: Iloilo City, Philippines
  • Based: Southern California, CA, USA

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Eve's Mistress (screen capture)

Angela Peñaredondo

2016 Screen capture of video performance Courtesy of the artist.

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Angela Peñaredondo

b. 1979

Born in Iloilo City, Philippines, Angela Peñaredondo is a Pilipinx poet and artist (on other days, she identifies as a usual ghost, subdued comet, or part-time animal). Her first full-length book, All Things Lose Thousands of Times (Inlandia Institute, 2016) is the winner of the Hillary Gravendyk Poetry Prize. She is the author of a chapbook, Maroon (Jamii Publications, 2015). Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in AAWW’s The Margins, Four Way Review, Cream City Review, Southern Humanities Review, South Dakota Review, Dusie and elsewhere. She is a VONA/Voices of our Nations Art fellow as well as a recipient of a University of California Institute for Research in the Arts Grant, the Gluck Program of the Arts Fellowship, Naropa University’s Zora Neal Hurston Award, Squaw Valley Writers Fellowship, and Fishtrap Fellowship. She has received scholarships from Tin House, Split This Rock, Dzanc Books' International Literary Program, and others.

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  • Born: Iloilo City, Philippines
  • Based: Southern California, CA, USA

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Fall (Four Seasons Series)

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

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Jessica Lichtenstein

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Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

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  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

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Fall (Four Seasons Series), detail

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

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Jessica Lichtenstein

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Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

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  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

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Deirdre McKay

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Dr. McKay is a Senior Lecturer in Social Geography and Environmental Politics at Keele University. Previously she held appointments as a Postdoctoral Fellow and then Research Fellow in the School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University. McKay earned her B.A. (1st Hons) in Biology and Master's in Environmental Studies from Dalhousie University (Canada) and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. McKay's research draws on both social/cultural geography and social anthropology to explore people's place-based experiences of globalization and development. She is interested in the long-distance relations that connect outmigrants to their sending communities, changes in local livelihoods and the possibilities for locally sustainable, alternative economic development, and environmental degradation linked to migration. Dr. McKay does fieldwork in the global South and also with migrant communities from developing areas who have moved into the world's global cities. Much of her work has been conducted with people who originate in indigenous villages in the northern Philippines. Dr. McKay is the author of numerous articles, chapters, and edited collections. Her book, Global Filipinos: Migrants' Lives in the Virtual Village, was published in 2012 by Indiana University Press.

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  • Born: Halifax, Canada
  • Based: Keele, Staffordshire, England

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for the fortunes you've made

Wawi Navarroza

2009 Durst Lambda photograph 8 in. x 12 in. Editions of 10 + 3 AP From the Perhaps It Was Possibly Because series

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Wawi Navarroza

b. 1979
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Wawi Navarroza is a photographer/multi-disciplinary artist from Manila, Philippines. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from De La Salle University, Manila and attended continuing education at the International Center of Photography, New York. Recently, Navarroza completed her scholarship at the Istituto Europeo di Design, Madrid under the program European Master of Fine Art Photography.

Her work with contemporary photography has taken shape in highly-stylized symbolic mise-en-scène and tableau vivants, shifting to her more recent interest in landscape, constructed still life, and installation. Her landscape photographs propose a familiar 'other place' that opens up to fabricated emotional space that seems to be carved out by both personal and collective memory and amnesia.

Navarroza has exhibited widely in the Philippines and internationally. She has participated at the 2012 Tokyo Month of Photography, presented by Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography; the Asian Art Biennale, in Taichung, Taiwan (2011); the annual touring exhibition "CUT: New Photography from South East Asia," by Valentine Willie Fine Art (VWFA) Kuala Lumpur; ASEAN-Korea’s "Emerging Wave" Asian Contemporary Photography Exhibition in Seoul, Korea (2010); and "Verso Manila: contemporary art from the Philippines" in Turin, Italy (2009). She has also been shown at Angkor Photography Festival Cambodia, Noorderlicht Photography Festival Holland, and PhotoIreland.

Recent solo exhibits include "ULTRAMAR, Pt.1: Gathered Throng, Falling Into Place" (2012) and "Dominion" (2011), at Silverlens Gallery, Manila, and "On Landscapes and Some Dislocations" at Galería Patrick Domken, Cadaqués, Spain. She has received a number of awards, such as the Cultural Center of the Philippines' Thirteen Artists Awards Triennial (2012), Lumi Photographic Art Awards, Helsinki (2011), and she was a finalist for the prestigious Sovereign Asian Art Prize (2011) and Singapore Museum Signature Art Prize (2011). Other awards include International Photography Awards (2010), Portfolio Preis (2010, Germany), and Prix de la Photographie Paris (2009). She has staged two award-winning solo exhibitions: “POLYSACCHARIDE: The Dollhouse Drama” (2005) and “SATURNINE: A Collection of Portraits, Creatures, Glass, and Shadow” (2007), which was cited Winner at the Ateneo Art Awards 2007, Philippines. In 2009, Navarroza was awarded the first Asian Cultural Council-Silverlens Fellowship Grant to further her research and practice in New York City.

Her work has been shown in institutions such as the National Museum of the Philippines, Metropolitan Museum of Manila, Mongolian National Modern Art Gallery, Hangaram Museum, Korea, National Museum of Fine Arts, Taichung, Taiwan, and Fries Museum of Contemporary Art, Netherlands.

Navarroza has also worked as a lecturer of photography at De La Salle University and as an independent curator. She also sings for a post-punk rock band called The Late Isabel. In the past few years she has based herself in Madrid, Barcelona and Cadaqués, Spain. Currently, Navarroza is working and living in Manila, Philippines.

Photograph by Gabby Cantero.

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  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: Manila, Philippines

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GENERAL DYNAMICS 2.0

Zavé Martohardjono

Apr 2017 Photodocumentation of GENERAL DYNAMICS 2.0 performed at Gibney Dance Company Courtesy of Zavé Martohardjono Photograph by Scott Shaw

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Zavé Martohardjono

b. 1984
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Zavé Martohardjono is an interdisciplinary artist interested in geopolitics, social justice, queer glam, and embodied healing. They were born in Canada and call New York City and Indonesia home. They received their B.A. in International Relations from Brown University (2006) and M.F.A. in Media Arts Production from the City College of New York (2009). They’ve performed at BAAD!, Boston Center for the Arts, Center for Performance Research, Gibney Dance, Issue Project Room, Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Movement Research at Judson Church, Panoply Performance Laboratory, Recess, and the Wild Project. Zavé is currently a dance artist in residence at the Bronx Museum of the Arts through the BxMA Co-Lab residency. Previously, Zavé was a Gibney Dance Work Up 3.0 artist (2017); had residencies at The Shandaken Project at Storm King (2016), La MaMa (2016), Chez Bushwick (2015); and was a Lambda Literary Fellow (2015). They recently contributed to Dancer-Citizen Issue 4 and MXRS Commons' February 2017 Commons. When not performing, they work at the ACLU, organize with artists of color in NYC, and are a Third Wave Fund advisory board member.

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  • Born: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Based: Brooklyn, NY, USA

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