topic

Making cultures

From sending gifts and cassette tapes of news to loved ones to producing visual, written, aural, and performing arts, “making cultures” reflects the enormous diversity of everyday, exceptional creation that Filipinos in the Philippines and its diaspora undertake to make sense of and comment upon their conditions. These scholarly and creative works indicate both the range of ways in which Filipinos make culture and the intensity with which they engage it.

 

As they go about the daily culture-making of getting to and from work, taking care of themselves and others, eating and being, Filipinos also make cultures by writing, painting, sculpting, performing, by intervening in and disrupting their erasure with their presence. These latter, more familiar modes of making culture draw on Filipinos' ongoing experiences of imperial history, global movement, labor, and encounter. The range of responses and intersections between the works gathered here further indicates the intensity and vitality with which Filipinos and others engage with the process and meaning of making cultures.

 

By recognizing these activities as a formal topic, CA+T underscores that making cultures is just as much a form of labor, albeit frequently unrecognized and unpaid, as the more formalized work that drives much of Filipinos’ global migration.

Searching for the Land of Salt

Aileen Suzara

Oct 02, 2013 Blog post. Courtesy of the author. Kitchen Kwento

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Aileen Suzara

b. 1984
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Aileen Suzara is a land-based educator, eco-advocate, and cook. She was born in Washington, raised mostly on the Big Island of Hawai’i, and is currently based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her family spans the Philippines and North America, and these places define her. While she has spent years working towards building healthier communities, sustainable foods, and environmental justice, she also carries a torch for storytelling and its abilities to inspire, move, and transform. Currently, she is in the University of California, Berkeley’s graduate school of public health and nutrition. She is exploring the potential to lift up traditional Filipino-inspired foodways as one solution towards chronic disease that will also boost ecological health and the livelihood of small farmers. This goal builds on years of cooking, eating, growing food, conversations, and learning from many cultural and agricultural bearers.

When I was eight years old, I told my parents that I wanted to grow up to be a farmer and chef (and not a doctor, which is what they had hoped for). I’m still not sure where that desire came from, but it stuck. It was around this time that I also “discovered” my first Filipino cookbook, a falling-apart book brought overseas by my mother when they migrated. That was the start of a lifelong exploration into food and culture, and the rediscovery of a nearly-lost culinary legacy in our family.

I have always been fascinated by the cycles of the natural world, and I sought to learn everything I could along the pathway between soil, seed, plate, and self. While an undergraduate at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts, I dropped out of pre-medicine to pursue an environmental pathway. I continued to circle around this love for food, its connection to land, and a desire to pursue healing in a different pathway than medicine.

Four years ago, I finally took a leap and trained as a natural chef. Wanting to know if food was the right path, I went on to win a Filipino food cook-off, which I read as a sign from the universe to keep going. However, I soon realized cooking alone could not fulfill a deeper calling to reconnect to the literal roots of food. I wanted to farm, so I continued on to train in agroecology at the University of California, Santa Cruz’s beloved Farm and Garden apprenticeship program, and I completed a second year in practice, living in a yurt, teaching, growing food, and raising chickens and goats on a small-scale organic farm. That yielded my absolute, deepest sense of connection: growing what we ate, feeling the movement of the day and the seasons, that tired yet satisfied feeling in muscles and bones. It deepened both a sense of honoring but also outrage at the status of growers in this country, whose handiwork feeds everyone.

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  • Born: Pasco, WA, USA
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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Alexander Orquiza

b. 1980

Alexander Orquiza is a historian of the twentieth century United States and the Philippines. From 2012-2013, he was an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Wellesley College, and he joined the Tutorial Board of History and Literature at Harvard University in fall 2014. He received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, his M.Phil. from the University of Edinburgh, and his Ph.D. in history from the Johns Hopkins University.
 
His work focuses on cultural and intellectual exchange between the US and the Philippines. His first book, A Pacific Palate: Food and the Philippine Middle Class during the American Period, 1898-1946, is forthcoming. It examines how American colonial reformers, businessmen, educators, and bureaucrats used food to transform the daily lives of Filipinos. Orquiza contends that food reform was essential to the American imperial mission in the Philippines. It created new consumers for American goods as well as farmers who produced goods for the American consumer market. These food reforms affected generations of Filipino public school students and transformed menus in restaurants and hotels. They were part of visual culture in magazine and newspaper advertisements, and were the focus of Philippine-American economic and political debates.
 
Orquiza argues that food is a powerful lens for examining history. Too often, society only considers the fleeting consumer aspects of food—where is the hip new restaurant, what is the latest food fad, how to make so-called “authentic” versions of dishes. But society often ignores the equally important aspects of food supply: how do ingredients arrive at our tables, who is working in farms and kitchens, are they receiving a fair and decent wage. Orquiza asserts history has shaped our individual roles in this market. Knowing how these roles evolved and how they changed over time is just as important as nutritional labels and Yelp reviews. As a historian, Orquiza believes the answers to these questions about food lie in our knowledge of the past.
 

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Amy Besa

Amy Besa is a native of the Philippines and with her husband and business partner, Romy Dorotan, also from the Philippines, owns and operates Purple Yam in Ditmas Park, Brooklyn, New York. Previously, the couple owned the Filipino restaurant Cendrillon in New York, which was open from 1995 to 2009.

In 2006, Amy and Romy co-authored Memories of Philippine Kitchens (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, 2006), which won the IACP [interntaional Association of Culinary Professionals] Jane Grigson Award for Distinguished Scholarship in the Quality of Research Presentation.

The book describes the melding of native traditions with those of Chinese, Spanish, and American cuisines. They have spent years tracing the foods of the Philippines, and in the book they share the results of that research. From Lumpia, Pancit, and Kinilaw to Adobo and Lehon (the art of the well-roasted pig), the authors document dishes and culinary techniques that are rapidly disappearing and in some cases unknown to Filipinos whether in the Philippines or abroad.

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  • Born: The Philippines
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

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Alexander Orquiza

b. 1980

Alexander Orquiza is a historian of the twentieth century United States and the Philippines. From 2012-2013, he was an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Wellesley College, and he joined the Tutorial Board of History and Literature at Harvard University in fall 2014. He received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, his M.Phil. from the University of Edinburgh, and his Ph.D. in history from the Johns Hopkins University.
 
His work focuses on cultural and intellectual exchange between the US and the Philippines. His first book, A Pacific Palate: Food and the Philippine Middle Class during the American Period, 1898-1946, is forthcoming. It examines how American colonial reformers, businessmen, educators, and bureaucrats used food to transform the daily lives of Filipinos. Orquiza contends that food reform was essential to the American imperial mission in the Philippines. It created new consumers for American goods as well as farmers who produced goods for the American consumer market. These food reforms affected generations of Filipino public school students and transformed menus in restaurants and hotels. They were part of visual culture in magazine and newspaper advertisements, and were the focus of Philippine-American economic and political debates.
 
Orquiza argues that food is a powerful lens for examining history. Too often, society only considers the fleeting consumer aspects of food—where is the hip new restaurant, what is the latest food fad, how to make so-called “authentic” versions of dishes. But society often ignores the equally important aspects of food supply: how do ingredients arrive at our tables, who is working in farms and kitchens, are they receiving a fair and decent wage. Orquiza asserts history has shaped our individual roles in this market. Knowing how these roles evolved and how they changed over time is just as important as nutritional labels and Yelp reviews. As a historian, Orquiza believes the answers to these questions about food lie in our knowledge of the past.
 

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Amy Besa

Amy Besa is a native of the Philippines and with her husband and business partner, Romy Dorotan, also from the Philippines, owns and operates Purple Yam in Ditmas Park, Brooklyn, New York. Previously, the couple owned the Filipino restaurant Cendrillon in New York, which was open from 1995 to 2009.

In 2006, Amy and Romy co-authored Memories of Philippine Kitchens (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, 2006), which won the IACP [interntaional Association of Culinary Professionals] Jane Grigson Award for Distinguished Scholarship in the Quality of Research Presentation.

The book describes the melding of native traditions with those of Chinese, Spanish, and American cuisines. They have spent years tracing the foods of the Philippines, and in the book they share the results of that research. From Lumpia, Pancit, and Kinilaw to Adobo and Lehon (the art of the well-roasted pig), the authors document dishes and culinary techniques that are rapidly disappearing and in some cases unknown to Filipinos whether in the Philippines or abroad.

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  • Born: The Philippines
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

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Clare Counihan

b. 1977
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Clare Counihan earned her M.A. and Ph.D. in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and her B.A. in English Literature from Duke University. Her research focuses on contemporary southern African experimental literature and the relationship between narrative form and national belonging for unbeloved subjects. She is also deeply interested in food: eating it, cooking it, understanding the ways it reflects and mediates our identities and interactions.

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Sarita Echavez See

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Sarita Echavez See was born in New York City but raised as an "embassy brat" moving from city to city around the world. She received her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, where she first became involved with U.S. women of color politics, especially the arts and culture movement. She obtained her Ph.D. in English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. While studying in New York City, she met the Filipino American artists and writers who inspired and continue to inspire her teaching and scholarship. In 2013, she joined the faculty of the University of California, Riverside, where she is an associate professor of Media and Cultural Studies. She previously taught at Williams College, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the University of California, Davis. Her research and teaching interests include Asian American and Filipino American cultural critique, postcolonial and empire studies, narrative, and theories of gender and sexuality. She is the author of the book-length study The Decolonized Eye: Filipino American Art and Performance (University of Minnesota Press, 2009), in which she argues that contemporary Filipino American forms of aesthetic and performative abstraction powerfully expose and indict the history of American imperialism as itself a form of abstraction. She is at work on the book-length project “Against Accumulation,” which is a study of the politics of accumulation in the American museum and university and of the politics of anti-accumulation in Filipino American theatre, writing, and visual art. She was one of the core organizers of the 2011 conference "Critical Ethnic Studies and the Future of Genocide" held at the University of California, Riverside, and she has served as a member of the working board of the Critical Ethnic Studies Association. In her work with the Center for Art and Thought and its focus on the contemporary medium of the digital, she envisions CA+T to be a transnational venue for more meaningful, reciprocal encounters between artists and scholars, and she is committed to fostering new forms of literacy, rather than tutelage, and to the transformation, rather than the mere transmission and replication, of knowledge.

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  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

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Mediated Diasporas: Material Translations of the Philippines in a Globalized World

Deirdre McKay Mark Johnson

2011 Criticism 16 pages. Courtesy of IP Publishing.

South East Asia Research 19. 2 (2011): 181-196.

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Deirdre McKay

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Dr. McKay is a Senior Lecturer in Social Geography and Environmental Politics at Keele University. Previously she held appointments as a Postdoctoral Fellow and then Research Fellow in the School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University. McKay earned her B.A. (1st Hons) in Biology and Master's in Environmental Studies from Dalhousie University (Canada) and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. McKay's research draws on both social/cultural geography and social anthropology to explore people's place-based experiences of globalization and development. She is interested in the long-distance relations that connect outmigrants to their sending communities, changes in local livelihoods and the possibilities for locally sustainable, alternative economic development, and environmental degradation linked to migration. Dr. McKay does fieldwork in the global South and also with migrant communities from developing areas who have moved into the world's global cities. Much of her work has been conducted with people who originate in indigenous villages in the northern Philippines. Dr. McKay is the author of numerous articles, chapters, and edited collections. Her book, Global Filipinos: Migrants' Lives in the Virtual Village, was published in 2012 by Indiana University Press.

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Mark Johnson

b. 1963
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I was born in Oklahoma in 1963, but I spent most of my childhood in the Southern Philippines, living in Sulu and Zamboanga.  It is that early experience that underpins my continuing interest in and research about Filipino Muslims in particular.  After taking my first degree in California, I moved subsequently to the U.K. where I undertook postgraduate training, first in Archaeology and then Anthropology, at University College London.

My research interests and writing are focused broadly around the issues of gender/sexuality, landscape and material culture, movement and transnationalism. I have conducted ethnographic research in the Philippines, Vietnam, Costa Rica and, more recently, Saudi Arabia. My original research in the Philippines was concerned with gender and sexual diversity in the context of both real and imagined movements of people and the growth of ethno-nationalist discourse. Recent Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded research focused on the place of religion in the experiences of Filipino migrant workers in the Middle East and Saudi Arabia in particular.

Books

2011. Diasporic Journeys, Ritual, and Normativity among Asian Migrant Women. London: Routledge. (with Pnina Werbner, eds.)

1997. Beauty and Power:  Transgendering and Cultural Transformation in the Southern Philippines.  Oxford: Berg.

Edited Journal Issues

2012.  Queer Asian Subjects:  Transgressive Sexualities and Heteronormative Meanings.  Asian Studies Review 36(4) December. (with E. Blackwood, eds.)

2011. Mediated Diasporas: Material Translation of the Philippines in a Globalized World. South East Asia Research 19(2): 181-341. (with D. McKay, eds)

2010.  Diasporic Encounters, Sacred Journeys:  Ritual, Normativity and the Religious Imagination among International Asian Migrant Women. Special double issue of The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology11 (3-4): 205-448.  (with P. Werbner, eds.)

2000.  Gender and Sexual Diversity in East and South-East Asia. Culture, Health and Sexuality 2(4): 361-472. (with P. Jackson, eds.)

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  • Born: Oklahoma, USA
  • Based: Hull, England, UK

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The Brick Oven

DeNNiSOmeRa

2012 Poem. Courtesy of the author.

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DeNNiSOmeRa

b. Year of the Snake/US ImmigratioNationality Act
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Practicing pokin'wordsplayw/pinch/punch of performancEa®thistor/y on and off the page, in and out of his mindbody, DeNNiSOmeRa is a writerliPOethink®, nEOnotsoPOst.©o.lOnial FOet/schola®©tivisavista, FOst.©o.lOnial FOetal.

Born in Baguio City, Benguet Province, Luzon Island on the archipelago known in the second language of its colonization as the Philippines, Dennis emigrated in his mother's lap to the US when he was eleven months old. He grew up His growth wa s tunted in the intolerance/ignorance of Sacramento, CA, the larger US misrepresentations and omissions of Asian/Pilipino-American from literature, history, media, and authority/leadershiPositions. Eventually he was borne by the ink and movement of the pen on page then toncescreened through keyboard, the act of writing performing his ontology through and in spite of WEstern eUrocentric olonialimperial assimilationist, objectifying, appropriative logics.

After graduating from UCSanta Cruz, then migrating to San FranciscOakland where he worked with youth for several years, he returned to the Philippines (and Southeast Asia) for the firstime since his i'mmigration. At an aRts festival in his birthplace, he participated in poetry and video workshops. After nine months in the Philippines and three traveling in Southeast Asia, he returned to the US, where he continued to grow his writing & performancEa® th r ough workshops, open mics and performance opportunities back in the SF Bay Area via June Jordan's Poetry for the People at UCBerkeley, Glide Memorial Church and the Mission Cultural Center in SF, the Ohana Open Mic in Oakland, Kearny Street Workshop in SF and a PilipinoAM theater based in SF, SOMA's Bindlestiff Studios.

Following a year at California College of Arts and Crafts, he found Mills College in Oakland to be the place where his thoroughandling of language were most at home. Through Mills, he not only refined a praxis of experimentaLANGUAGE writing to represent his thoughts poetically in the M.F.A.––but also during performance collaborations w/experimental musicians and dancers in/out of his mindbody––he continUed to further the process and perFORMance of language beyond the page: sowing seeds for his present pursuit of a Ph.D. in Performance Studies at UCDavis. Dennis' writing has been published online and off in poetry journals Tinfish, Chain, Cricket Online Review, Bay Poetics, POMPOM, 2nd Avenue Poetry, Deep Oakland. His morecent wordsplaying has been focused just off screen in a film narration performance called movietelling(Lew)/Katsuben (a silent film era Japanese form(oreso the Korean Pyonsa who subverted Japanese propaganda films in their colonial era there), performing his mov[i.e.]telling work nationally in NYC, Miami, Oakland SF.

My current aRtisticreati've work is a poeticritical illumination of the colonialimperial/patriarchal inscription on the mindbody through poeticritical archi“text”uralandscapes–––primarily revisioning in the form of mov[i.e.]telling/Katsuben: a Japanese form of film narration from the silent film era; he better identifies with the Korean film narrators called Pyonsa who subverted Japanese colonial propaganda films in their colonial era there.

Through a nEOnotsOpoOst©olOnialense, my critical work and research attends to persistent assimilative logics, objectificational representation practices and intellectual appropriations in settler hegemonicolonial culture perpetuating continued epistemicolonial violences––stemming from WEstern civilization'self-constitution as the repression and projection of its disowned savage/barbarian/heathen on all Others and continUed consolidation through persistent un/conscioUS EUrasing t/races of Others and the EUrasure of thesEUrasures–––and the critical/theoretical and comparative gestures in hybridiasporic poetics by intellectuals and writers of the "missing passage", specifically around the tropes of utterance, speech, the tongue, languagetc. as constant and continued DEcolonizingeMpoweresponses to, aswellasymptoms of a continuing white WEsterneUrocentric hegemonicolonial state.

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  • Born: Baguio City, Philippines
  • Based: Oakland, CA, USA
  • Also Based in: Baguio City, Philippines
    San Francisco, CA, USA

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Why Sinigang?

Doreen Gamboa Fernandez

1988 - 2014 Criticism. 6 pages. Courtesy of the family of Doreen Fernandez. Sarap: Essays on Philippine Food

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Doreen Gamboa Fernandez

b. 1934-2002

Doreen Gamboa Fernandez was born on 28 October 1934 to Aguinaldo Severino Gamboa of Silay, Negros Occidental and Alicia Lucero Gamboa of Cabanatuan, Nueva Ecija.

She obtained her A.B., major in English and History in 1954 from St. Scholastica's College, Manila and completed her M.A. in English Literature (1956) and Ph.D. in Literature (1976) from the Ateneo de Manila University. She began teaching at the Ateneo de Manila in 1972 and chaired the departments of Communication, English and Interdisciplinary Studies. She was a member of the editorial boards of Philippine Studies, Filipinas Journal of Philippine Studies, and The Asian Theatre Journal. She would have rendered thirty years service in October 2002.

In 1998 she was recognized with Metrobank Foundation's Outstanding Teacher Award.

She taught literature, composition, creative as well as critical writing, and journalism. Her research included cultural, literary, theater and culinary history, on which she has written for scholarly and popular publications and had regularly been invited to speak at international conferences and symposiums.

She was twice a recipient of the Fulbright Asian Scholar in Residence Award (1983, Ohio University Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute; 1992, Michigan University Seminar on Southeast Asian Literatures in Translation).

A prolific writer, she authored the Iloilo Zarzuela: 1903-1930 (1978); In Performance (1981); Tikim: Essays on Philippine Food and Culture (1994); Face to Face: The Craft of Interviewing (1995); Palabas: Essays on Philippine Theater History (1996); Fruits of thePhilippines (1997); Palayok: Philippine Food Through Time, On Site, In the Pot (2000). With Edilberto N. Alegre, she co-authored "The Writer and His Milieu (1984) and Writers and Their Milieu (1987, recipient of National Book Award); the Lasa series on dining in Manila and the provinces (1989, 1990, 1992); Sarap: Essays on Philippine Food and Culture (1988); and Kinilaw: A Philippine Cuisine of Freshness (1991).

She wrote video scripts as well: Tikim, a video documentary on Philippine food (1989, Philippine Information Agency); Panitikan on Philippine literature (1992, CCP), which earned first prize, video documentary category from the Film Academy of the Philippines; and Dulaan on Philippine contemporary theater (1994, CCP).

She was a columnist of The Manila Chronicle, Mr. & Ms. magazine, the Philippine Journal of Education, the Philippine Daily Inquirer, and Food magazine. She has contributed numerous articles in journals, periodicals and books, including to The Oxford Companion to Food (1999, Oxford University Press).

She was editor and contributor to the CCP Encyclopedia of Philippine Art (1994, Cultural Center of the Philippines); contributor to the Encyclopedia of Post-Colonial Literatures in English (1995, Routledge), and with Resil Mojares to Modern Southeast Asian Literature in Translation: A Resource for Teaching (1997, Arizona State University); and editorial consultant as well as contributor to the 10-volume Kasaysayan: The Story of the Filipino People (1998, Asia Publishing Co Ltd).

She was co-founder of the Babaylan Theater Group (1973, with Nicanor G. Tiongson), and the Cultural Research Association of the Philippines (1975). She was a member of the board of trustees of the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP), Philippine Educational Theater Association (PETA), and the Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation, among others. She was also a member of the Manila Critics Circleand of the judiciary for the Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature.

She received the Achievement Award from the National Research Council in 1997, and in 1999 she was recognized with the CCP Centennial Honors for the Arts (Cultural Center of the Philippines and the Philippine Centennial Commission), honoring 100 Filipinos who helped shape the arts in the Philippines in the last century (1898-1998).

She was married to interior designer Wili Fernandez.

 

Photograph by Stella Kalaw.

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  • Born: The Philippines
  • Based: Manila, Philippines

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The Head Is the Best Part/ September 29, 2013

Elaine Castillo

Sep 29, 2013 Video. 8 min 56 sec Courtesy of the artist.

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Elaine Castillo

b. 1984
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Elaine Castillo was born in the San Francisco Bay Area and currently lives in southeast London. Her writing can be found or is forthcoming at make/shift magazine, The Rumpus, [PANK] Magazine and Feminist Review, among others. She is also a board member of Digital Desperados, a Glasgow-based film collective for women of color. At the end of March, one of her short films was screened at The Future Weird, a Brooklyn-based film series run by Derica Shields and Megan Eardly, devoted to films exploring non-Western futurisms. She is currently at work on a novel, A Filipineia.

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  • Born: San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Based: London, England, UK
  • Also Based in: San Francisco, CA, USA

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Enrique G. Oracion, Ph.D.

b. 1960
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Born in 1960, in a farming community in Bayawan City, Negros Oriental in central Philippines, I was exposed early to the realities of country life and environmental problems that push poor people to migrate or to move to places they believe can offer them a better life. This exposure may have eventually inspired me to take a degree that deals with human and societal issues and problems. In 1989, after I got married, I moved to Dumaguete City, the capital city of Negros Oriental, and permanently settled here with my family of procreation. I currently work at Silliman University in Dumaguete City as anthropology professor and Research Director.

I earned my Bachelor of Arts degree major in Sociology as a library assistant and an academic scholar in Silliman University. Immediately after completing my baccalaureate degree in 1980, I enrolled in the Master's Program in Sociology through a work-study grant from the same university and graduated in 1984. My thesis focused on a spatio-temporal analysis of the socioeconomic adaptation of the Negritos, one of the indigenous peoples in Negros Oriental, to environmental changes in the uplands of the province where they have been settled for centuries.

After I completed my Master of Arts degree in Sociology, I concentrated on teaching, both in the secondary and tertiary levels, and research until I decided to pursue my doctorate in the Anthropology program at the University of San Carlos in Cebu City. I completed the degree in 2006. My dissertation examined the cultural and local politics of marine protected area management in one coastal municipality in Negros Oriental, which has become a popular dive tourism destination because of its marine biodiversity.

My academic preparation in Sociology, commonly associated with quantitative research, and in Anthropology, recognized for its ethnographic research techniques, has provided me a better grasp of interdisciplinary perspectives on doing research. Anchored in gender and environmental issues and frameworks of analysis, my research interests are varied and include the role of women in resource management and reproductive health, the human dimensions of environmental management, environmental anthropology and ecotourism, cultural and natural heritage management, and service-learning and environmental interventions.

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  • Born: Bayawan City, Negros Oriental, Philippines
  • Based: Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental, Philippines

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Fictions of Return in Filipino America

Eric Estuar Reyes

2011 - 2013 Criticism 18 pages. Courtesy of Duke University Press.

positions 19.2 (2011): 99-117.

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Eric Estuar Reyes

b. 1965

Eric Estuar Reyes is currently Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at California State University at Fullerton.  He was born in Manila, Philippines in 1965, spent his childhood in Hawai’i (USA), Naples (Italy), Rhode Island, New Orleans, LA (USA), and San Diego, CA (USA).  In the U.S., he has lived in Santa Cruz, Providence, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.  He received his Ph.D. in American Civilization from Brown University, his M.A. in Urban Planning from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his B.A., with majors in Mathematics and Modern Society and Social Thought, from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

His research interests focus on race and space with specific attention to Filipino America, queerness, urban spaces in the U.S. and Asia, and community cultural development.  He has worked on projects in various places including Manila and Los Angeles.  Dr. Reyes is currently completing a manuscript on the sociospatial production of Filipino America.  

Throughout his career, Dr. Reyes has worked with community-based organizations working on community health issues such as HIV/AIDS in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities and community arts development in Filipino American communities.  He has worked with organizations in Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco.

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  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: Los Angeles, CA, USA

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