curated exhibition

Storm: A Typhoon Haiyan Recovery Project

What survives in the wake of a storm? One year after Super Typhoon Haiyan, Storm assembles a community of responders. Storm chronicles the creativity generated despite and beyond Haiyan's destruction.

 

The Philippines is exposed to about nineteen tropical cyclones per year. But in November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan became the worst disaster in the history of the Philippines. Haiyan killed more than 6,300 people, cost over $2 billion in damages, and affected over 16 million people.  

 

Our world increasingly is defined by disasters. We have witnessed catastrophes of apocalyptic proportions from storms like Haiyan and Katrina (United States 2005) to earthquakes like Fukushima (Japan 2011) and Port-au-Prince  (Haiti 2010).  During our curatorial process, some of the contributors to this exhibition faced new storms like Typhoons Rammasun, Fung Wong, and Vong Fong.

 

So this is not another moment of silence. We honor the dead with the noise of discontent. We also strive to reflect the radical love that propels efforts to support our kababayan. Little by little, each gesture of hope decenters the typhoon. Each act of hope reveals the people’s determination to recover.

 

Immerse yourself in the different dimensions of the healing process. From scholarly structural critiques to youth-initiated fundraisers. From poetic and musical renditions of collective grief to Hip Hop flash mobs to raise awareness.

 

Celebrate the indomitable human spirit and kapwa never lost in the flood.

 

Co-curated by Johanna F. Almiron and J. Lorenzo Perillo.

November 2014

 

For more information about community organizations that continue to help in the relief effort, navigate to the National Alliance for Filipino Concerns at http://nafconusa.org/ and CARE at http://care.org/emergencies/typhoon-haiyan.

 

Contributors:

Chelo A. and Xien How

Amanda Solomon Amorao

Christian Almiron of Gentei Kaijo

Jennifer Almiron

Ray Basa and Raffy Piamonte

Nana Buxani

Jeff Arellano Cabusao

Critical Filipina/Filipino Studies Collective

Francesco Conte

Franz DG

Rodrigo de la Peña

Hannah Dormido

Hip Hop Dance Association

Francis Estrada

Joel Kahn

Joseph Legaspi

Dindo Llana

Enrico Maniago

Isabel Manalo

Alex Orquiza

Lordy Rodriguez

Robyn Rodriguez

Catcher, Carver and Jhoanna Salazar

E. San Juan Jr.

Janice Sapigao

Melissa Sipin


Special thanks to the American Studies Association, Valerie Francisco, Erwin Mendoza, Anna Sarao, Gina Rosales, Emerson Aquino, Arnel Calvario, Kim Alidio, National Alliance for Filipino Concerns, and Father Alvin Cabacang.

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Alexander Orquiza

b. 1980

Alexander Orquiza is a historian of the twentieth century United States and the Philippines. From 2012-2013, he was an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Wellesley College, and he joined the Tutorial Board of History and Literature at Harvard University in fall 2014. He received his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, his M.Phil. from the University of Edinburgh, and his Ph.D. in history from the Johns Hopkins University.
 
His work focuses on cultural and intellectual exchange between the US and the Philippines. His first book, A Pacific Palate: Food and the Philippine Middle Class during the American Period, 1898-1946, is forthcoming. It examines how American colonial reformers, businessmen, educators, and bureaucrats used food to transform the daily lives of Filipinos. Orquiza contends that food reform was essential to the American imperial mission in the Philippines. It created new consumers for American goods as well as farmers who produced goods for the American consumer market. These food reforms affected generations of Filipino public school students and transformed menus in restaurants and hotels. They were part of visual culture in magazine and newspaper advertisements, and were the focus of Philippine-American economic and political debates.
 
Orquiza argues that food is a powerful lens for examining history. Too often, society only considers the fleeting consumer aspects of food—where is the hip new restaurant, what is the latest food fad, how to make so-called “authentic” versions of dishes. But society often ignores the equally important aspects of food supply: how do ingredients arrive at our tables, who is working in farms and kitchens, are they receiving a fair and decent wage. Orquiza asserts history has shaped our individual roles in this market. Knowing how these roles evolved and how they changed over time is just as important as nutritional labels and Yelp reviews. As a historian, Orquiza believes the answers to these questions about food lie in our knowledge of the past.
 

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  • Born: USA
  • Based: Boston, MA, USA

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Chance for Change

Chelo Aestrid XienHow

2014 Music video 4m 44s Courtesy of LivenFire Records and Chelo Aestrid

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Chelo Aestrid

b. 1980
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Chelo Aestrid is a Cebu-born, LA-raised, London-educated, and Manila-residing singer, dancer, host, writer, designer, actress, and entrepreneur. With powerful vocals, energetic dance moves, thought-provoking lyrics, funky style, and fun stage persona, she loves to thrill any crowd. She has performed in Asia, North America, and Europe and has opened for international acts such as Justin Timberlake, Ne-Yo, Timbaland, Nicki Minaj, and Pussycat Dolls. She has toured in Southeast Asia as an adidas Originals sponsored host with urban music legends Ali Shaheed Muhammad of Tribe Called Quest, Maceo of De La Soul, Tony Touch, and the Triple Threat DJ’s. She received “Best Dance Recording” from the Awit Awards, “Female Style Icon” and “Best Music Video” from the Urban Music Awards in Manila. She is a founding member of the Philippine Allstars, the two-time World Hip-hop Dance Champions. She also has experience in acting (TVCs and feature film), hosting, modeling (print), teaching dance, and organizing events. She is a founder of the clothing lines Capital G and BY:CHelo; and of the webstore BarongWarehouse.com, which sells quality barong tagalong at the lowest prices. She has studied Performing Arts, Architecture, and Fashion Design, and she finished a First Honours (Summa Cum Laude) Business Administration degree at Middlesex University, London, U.K. Lastly, she has been involved in non-profit organizations such as Gawad Kalinga, Child Hope, Rock Ed, Greenpeace, and Change.org. She also volunteered for disaster relief efforts including personally raising funds for her provincial hometown of Cebu after Typhoon Haiyan, which led to the creation of the song and foundation “Chance for Change” with XienHow.

Note: Chelo Aestrid collaborated with XienHow on the music video Chance for Change, which CA+T republished in its online exhibition Storm.

In November 2013, Typhoon Yolanda/Haiyan devastated most of the Visayas region of the Philippines. Thanks to many friends across the world we were able to provide some assistance to people who lost their homes in Borbon, Cebu. The job is not done, but we wanted to show you a great place to start helping the families already affected, and we wanted to create a sustainable platform for future funding for families affected by natural disasters. We started the CHANCE FOR CHANGE FOUNDATION and created a music video to show the sunny smiles of the Filipinos that never fade regardless of the challenges they face.

As a renaissance artist and a businesswoman, Chelo Aestrid is always striving to be her best self in any given situation through perseverance, passion, and positivity. She has been blessed to be able to do what she’s done so far, and only wishes to continue the good work and help others achieve their own highest potential. 

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XienHow

b. 1981
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XienHow was born Zen Seville and has had a very interesting life to say the least. Having moved 30 plus times by the time he was twelve, from Baja California all the way up to the Bay Area, he has a perspective that only people who have spent a lot of time traveling can have. Coming from parents with a spiritual background and belief system, he is very open minded and identifies himself as a spiritual person.  Having spent the greater part of the last 15 plus years honing his artistic talents and simultaneously working a full time “career job” in the construction industry, he is considered by many as an active member of many philanthropic and artistic circles. His professional experience has allowed him to develop an outstanding work ethic, which in turn helped him fund a lot of the community work and artistic platforms he continuously has provided to artistic communities throughout his career. In 2006, XienHow made his first trip to the Philippines where he fell in love with her people and culture. He has returned 13 times since then and has worked with the local entrepreneurs/philanthropists “Konektado” to continue creating positive and productive outlets and platforms for the people. Through his working relationship with Konektado, he met Chelo Aestrid, which is how the “Chance for Change” collaboration came to life. 

XienHow is an artist who focuses his music on the positive development of the mind and on changing the way people view their lives. He draws on the pain, struggles, and successes of his life to make music that he spreads on a global scale. He has worked with many legendary artists throughout the industry and has toured throughout the world and continues to do so. He is willing to work with other people with the same dedicated hard working ethical understanding. He works in the light of God and will not waver at the hands of darkness.

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  • Born: USA
  • Based: San Francisco, CA, USA

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Typhoon Haiyan Relief: A Critical Filipina/o Perspective

Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

Nov 24, 2013 Pamphlet 2 pages Courtesy of the Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

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Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

As an activist-scholar group, the Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective (CFFSC) seeks to organize educators and scholars to interrogate and challenge histories of Western imperialisms (Spanish and U.S. imperialisms), ongoing neocolonial relations in the Philippines, and their relationship to past and present Filipina/o migrations through our research and teaching both within the university and beyond it.

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Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

As an activist-scholar group, the Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective (CFFSC) seeks to organize educators and scholars to interrogate and challenge histories of Western imperialisms (Spanish and U.S. imperialisms), ongoing neocolonial relations in the Philippines, and their relationship to past and present Filipina/o migrations through our research and teaching both within the university and beyond it.

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Father Alvin Cabacang, OSM

Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

2013 Photograph Variable dimensions Courtesy of Valerie Francisco Caption: Father Cabacang performing an indigenous blessing dance at the opening of a cultural event to raise funds and awareness about Typhoon Haiyan affected regions

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Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

As an activist-scholar group, the Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective (CFFSC) seeks to organize educators and scholars to interrogate and challenge histories of Western imperialisms (Spanish and U.S. imperialisms), ongoing neocolonial relations in the Philippines, and their relationship to past and present Filipina/o migrations through our research and teaching both within the university and beyond it.

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Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective

As an activist-scholar group, the Critical Filipina and Filipino Studies Collective (CFFSC) seeks to organize educators and scholars to interrogate and challenge histories of Western imperialisms (Spanish and U.S. imperialisms), ongoing neocolonial relations in the Philippines, and their relationship to past and present Filipina/o migrations through our research and teaching both within the university and beyond it.

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Manananggal

Dindo Llana

1999 Acrylic on wood 2' x 4' Courtesy of Dindo Llana

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Dindo Llana

b. 1965
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I was born and grew up eating pakbet and bagnet in the Northern province of the Philippines, Ilocos Norte. I studied at the Philippine High School for the Arts in the kingdom of the deity Maria Makiling, Mount Makiling. It was there where I learned art. I took up fine arts at the University of the Philippines, Diliman where I was politicized and exposed to the other side of the Marcos regime. Hailing from Marcoslandia and spending four years of high school in an Imelda Marcos project playing angklung and banduria for Imelda dignitary visitors, it was at UP where I was awakened with the socio-political realities of the country at that time. I went on to work for multi-national companies in the advertising industry for more than two decades as an art director, selling consumer products from shampoo and deodorants to motor oils to food and beverages to cooperative banks. I worked on the side on book illustrations and designs garnering the Book Designer of the Year at the National Awards in 1998 and finalist for Best Children’s Book Award in 1996. I was awarded the Bronze Medal in the Art Association of the Philippine Painting Competition in 1995. I had my first Solo Exhibit in 1996, and I was censored several times after that in succeeding exhibitions because of the socio-political content of my works. They were socio-political satires of the Philippines. People in power in the Philippines just don’t have the sense of humor! I’ve stopped painting for a while until I was awarded with an art grant from the Asian Cultural Council in 2009. I’ve just retired from advertising, and I’m going to take Masters Studies in Anthropology. I’m starting in the art scene all over again.

This was the artist statement for the exhibit “Impakto” in 1999 at Ayala Museum where the works I’m submitting were part of:

Aswang. Tikbalang. Tiyanak. Mangkukulam. Sirena. Kapre. Engkanto. Nuno sa Punso.

We are afraid of them. They are our nightmare, these creatures of darkness. Mga IMPAKTO - the entities of nature: the mountains, forests, rivers, seas and the underground.

We are very afraid of them. They are the forces of unexplainable malevolence. We create devices to counter them. We appease them with offerings. We ask permission to enter their domain: “Tabi-tabi po! They serve as social controls, guardians of nature.

We are very very afraid of them. They harm us and make us ill.

But perhaps they are more afraid of us! We do more harm to their world. For the past 100 years, we have destroyed about 75% of their forests. We wrecked havoc on their mountains and coral reefs. We continue to poison their rivers, lakes and seas.

Who should be more afraid, us or them? Sino ang IMPAKTO, sila o tayo?

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  • Born: Badoc, Ilocos Norte
  • Based: Quezon City, Philippines

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Sirena

Dindo Llana

2009 Acrylic on wood 2' x 4' Courtesy of Dindo Llana

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Dindo Llana

b. 1965
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I was born and grew up eating pakbet and bagnet in the Northern province of the Philippines, Ilocos Norte. I studied at the Philippine High School for the Arts in the kingdom of the deity Maria Makiling, Mount Makiling. It was there where I learned art. I took up fine arts at the University of the Philippines, Diliman where I was politicized and exposed to the other side of the Marcos regime. Hailing from Marcoslandia and spending four years of high school in an Imelda Marcos project playing angklung and banduria for Imelda dignitary visitors, it was at UP where I was awakened with the socio-political realities of the country at that time. I went on to work for multi-national companies in the advertising industry for more than two decades as an art director, selling consumer products from shampoo and deodorants to motor oils to food and beverages to cooperative banks. I worked on the side on book illustrations and designs garnering the Book Designer of the Year at the National Awards in 1998 and finalist for Best Children’s Book Award in 1996. I was awarded the Bronze Medal in the Art Association of the Philippine Painting Competition in 1995. I had my first Solo Exhibit in 1996, and I was censored several times after that in succeeding exhibitions because of the socio-political content of my works. They were socio-political satires of the Philippines. People in power in the Philippines just don’t have the sense of humor! I’ve stopped painting for a while until I was awarded with an art grant from the Asian Cultural Council in 2009. I’ve just retired from advertising, and I’m going to take Masters Studies in Anthropology. I’m starting in the art scene all over again.

This was the artist statement for the exhibit “Impakto” in 1999 at Ayala Museum where the works I’m submitting were part of:

Aswang. Tikbalang. Tiyanak. Mangkukulam. Sirena. Kapre. Engkanto. Nuno sa Punso.

We are afraid of them. They are our nightmare, these creatures of darkness. Mga IMPAKTO - the entities of nature: the mountains, forests, rivers, seas and the underground.

We are very afraid of them. They are the forces of unexplainable malevolence. We create devices to counter them. We appease them with offerings. We ask permission to enter their domain: “Tabi-tabi po! They serve as social controls, guardians of nature.

We are very very afraid of them. They harm us and make us ill.

But perhaps they are more afraid of us! We do more harm to their world. For the past 100 years, we have destroyed about 75% of their forests. We wrecked havoc on their mountains and coral reefs. We continue to poison their rivers, lakes and seas.

Who should be more afraid, us or them? Sino ang IMPAKTO, sila o tayo?

location

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  • Born: Badoc, Ilocos Norte
  • Based: Quezon City, Philippines

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Engkantada

Dindo Llana

2009 Acrylic on wood 2' x 4' Courtesy of Dindo Llana

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Dindo Llana

b. 1965
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I was born and grew up eating pakbet and bagnet in the Northern province of the Philippines, Ilocos Norte. I studied at the Philippine High School for the Arts in the kingdom of the deity Maria Makiling, Mount Makiling. It was there where I learned art. I took up fine arts at the University of the Philippines, Diliman where I was politicized and exposed to the other side of the Marcos regime. Hailing from Marcoslandia and spending four years of high school in an Imelda Marcos project playing angklung and banduria for Imelda dignitary visitors, it was at UP where I was awakened with the socio-political realities of the country at that time. I went on to work for multi-national companies in the advertising industry for more than two decades as an art director, selling consumer products from shampoo and deodorants to motor oils to food and beverages to cooperative banks. I worked on the side on book illustrations and designs garnering the Book Designer of the Year at the National Awards in 1998 and finalist for Best Children’s Book Award in 1996. I was awarded the Bronze Medal in the Art Association of the Philippine Painting Competition in 1995. I had my first Solo Exhibit in 1996, and I was censored several times after that in succeeding exhibitions because of the socio-political content of my works. They were socio-political satires of the Philippines. People in power in the Philippines just don’t have the sense of humor! I’ve stopped painting for a while until I was awarded with an art grant from the Asian Cultural Council in 2009. I’ve just retired from advertising, and I’m going to take Masters Studies in Anthropology. I’m starting in the art scene all over again.

This was the artist statement for the exhibit “Impakto” in 1999 at Ayala Museum where the works I’m submitting were part of:

Aswang. Tikbalang. Tiyanak. Mangkukulam. Sirena. Kapre. Engkanto. Nuno sa Punso.

We are afraid of them. They are our nightmare, these creatures of darkness. Mga IMPAKTO - the entities of nature: the mountains, forests, rivers, seas and the underground.

We are very afraid of them. They are the forces of unexplainable malevolence. We create devices to counter them. We appease them with offerings. We ask permission to enter their domain: “Tabi-tabi po! They serve as social controls, guardians of nature.

We are very very afraid of them. They harm us and make us ill.

But perhaps they are more afraid of us! We do more harm to their world. For the past 100 years, we have destroyed about 75% of their forests. We wrecked havoc on their mountains and coral reefs. We continue to poison their rivers, lakes and seas.

Who should be more afraid, us or them? Sino ang IMPAKTO, sila o tayo?

location

X
  • Born: Badoc, Ilocos Norte
  • Based: Quezon City, Philippines

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Defend the Right to Land

Enrico Maniago

2012 Acrylic on canvas; collaboration with Panaghiusa 8 ft. x 4 ft. Courtesy of Enrico Maniago / Habi Arts

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Enrico Maniago

b. 1978
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Enrico Maniago is a Philippine-born artist who was transplanted to the United States before his teens.

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  • Born: The Philippines
  • Based: USA

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