curated exhibition

Sea, Land, Air: Migration and Labor

Filipinos work everywhere. On the high seas, up in the air, and on the ground. Nurse, sailor, singer, farmer, teacher, maid. These are the icons of globalized Filipino labor today. But where do they come from?

 

“Sea, Land, Air: Migration and Labor” locates these icons in the circuits of labor that emanate from the Philippines’ and its diaspora’s colonial and imperial histories. At the same time, the exhibition questions what is truthful and what is fictional in the narration of these imperial relations.

 

Over the summer of 2013, we unfolded “Sea, Land, Air” in groups designed to highlight the connections and complications that the scholarly and creative works collected here illuminate.

 

Scroll down. Explore. Comment on this rich mixture of creative and scholarly works that together reveal the global processes of economic and psychic transformation that all contemporary subjects—not just Filipinos—face. Return.

 

Co-curators: Jan Christian Bernabe and Sarita Echavez See.

 

Contributors: Filomeno V. Aguilar • Kimberly Alidio • Matthew Andrews • Michael Arcega • Tanya Bindra • Jason Cabañes • Zean Cabangis • Clement Camposano • Lonnie Carter • Catherine Ceniza Choy • Denise Cruz • Deirdre de la Cruz • Vince Diaz • Michelle Dizon • Kale Bantigue Fajardo • Theodore S. Gonzalves • Mik Gaspay • Jason Gavilan • Mark Johnson • Kat Larson • Miguel Libarnes • Claudia Liebelt • R. Zamora Linmark • Mirca Madianou • Wawi Navarroza • Jonathan C. Ong • Enrique G. Oracion, Ph.D. • Elizabeth H. Pisares • Eric Estuar Reyes • Dylan Rodriguez • Lordy Rodriguez • Robyn Magalit Rodriguez • Sarita See • Harrod Suarez • Nobue Suzuki • Stephanie Syjuco • Rolando Tolentino • Karen Tongson • Jenifer K. Wofford

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Catherine Ceniza Choy

Catherine Ceniza Choy is Professor and Department Chair of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of the award-winning book Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History (Duke University Press, 2003) and the forthcoming book Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America (New York University Press, 2013).  Catherine is a second-generation Filipino American born and raised in New York City. She received her Ph.D. in History from UCLA.

location

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  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: Berkeley, CA, USA

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We are the Jews of today: Filipino Domestic Workers in Israel and the Language of Diaspora

Claudia Liebelt

2008 Criticism 18 pages. Courtesy of HAGAR.

HAGAR Studies in Culture, Polity and Identities 8.1 (2008): 63-81.

contributor

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Claudia Liebelt

b. 1976
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Claudia Liebelt completed her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology in Halle and is a lecturer of social anthropology at the University of Bayreuth, Germany. Her research interests include urban anthropology, transnationalism, migration and citizenship, the Filipino labor diaspora, ritual and religion, gender, global care and domestic work, as well as the anthropology of the body. The scope of her work is reflected in her publications and her teaching, which includes courses on Transnational Migration, Care Work, Gender, Anthropology of Religion, the Middle East, the Body, and Medical Anthropology. She has conducted fieldwork in Israel, Morocco, Turkey and the Philippines.

In the framework of a comparative research project at Keele University (UK), she studied the “Sociality, Caring and the Religious Imagination in the Filipino Diaspora” (2007-2010, PI Professor Pnina Werbner). Among her publications is Caring for the ‘Holy Land’: Filipina Domestic Workers in Israel (Berghahn Books, 2011). She also co-directed an ethnographic documentary on Filipina return migrants in Manila, Cycles of Care, with Lizza M. David (UK/D 2011, 52 mins).

She currently works on a research project about aesthetic body modifications, beauty salons, feminity and the service sector in Istanbul, Turkey. Based on ethnographic research, this project seeks to contribute to our understanding of culturally informed, gendered bodily practices in their (urban) diversity, in defiance of the assumption of increasingly standardised beauty norms and images in an age of globalisation. Hereby, it seeks to investigate cultural imaginations of morality, public space, modernity, citizenship, technology and health in their relation to changing forms of gender and kinship in a global city.

location

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  • Born: Cologne, Germany
  • Based: Bayreuth, Germany

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contributor

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Clement C. Camposano, Ph.D.

b. 1966

Dr. Clem Camposano was born in 1966 in Iloilo City, the Philippines. He is presently based in Manila. He earned his Ph D. in Philippine Studies (Anthropology, 2009) from the University of the Philippines, and his current research interest is in the anthropology of migration, with emphasis on the transnationalization of the contemporary Filipino household. He holds an M.A. in Political Science from the University of the Philippines - Diliman (1992) and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and History from the University of the Philippines - Visayas (1986). Dr. Camposano has published articles in peer-reviewed journals and has presented academic papers in international conferences. He sits in the board of the Philippine Anthropological Association and is an active member of the Philippine Studies Association. He is a senior faculty member at the University of Asia and the Pacific (UA&P) where he teaches courses in social science research and Philippine history and culture. Dr. Camposano began his academic career right after the EDSA Revolution with faculty appointments at the West Visayas State University in 1986 and subsequently at the University of the Philippines in the Visayas in 1997. A person of diverse interests, he is presently the Chairman of the Philippine Center for Civic Education and Democracy (PCCED), a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion of citizenship and civic engagement among various sectors in Philippine society.

location

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  • Born: Iloilo City, Philippines
  • Based: Manila, Philippines

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contributor

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Daniel Miller

b. 1954

Daniel Miller was born in London in 1954. He is currently based at the Department of Anthropology with University College, London. He is the author or editor of thirty-five books dealing with different aspects of the anthropology of consumption, material culture and new media.

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Mirca Madianou

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Mirca Madianou is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Media and Communication, University of Leicester. From 2004 to 2011, she was Newton Trust Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Lucy Cavendish College. She holds a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics. She has published extensively on the social consequences of new media and mediation especially in relation to processes of migration, transnational relationships and networks. She is the author of Mediating the Nation: News, Audiences and the Politics of Identity (Routledge, 2005) and Migration and New Media (with Daniel Miller, Routledge, 2011) and co-editor of Ethics of Media (with Nick Couldry and Amit Pinchevski, 2013). Between 2007 and 2011, she was Principal Investigator on the Economic and Social Research Council-funded project "Migration, ICTS and transnational families," a comparative ethnographic study of Filipino and Caribbean transnational families and their uses of new communication technologies. She continues to work on Philippine migration and the role of digital media in transforming migrant networks.

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  • Born:
  • Based: Leicester, England, UK

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Coincidence and Consequence: Marianism and Mass Media in the Global Philippines

Deirdre De La Cruz

2009 Criticism 34 pages. Courtesy of the author. Cultural Anthropology 24.3 (2009): 455-488. Uncorrected page proofs.

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Deirdre De La Cruz

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Deirdre was born in Germany and has lived in Hawai’i, Seattle, and Manila. Her engagement with the Philippines and Filipino America has found a variety of expressions over the years, most recently as an Assistant Professor of Philippine Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she is currently based. In addition to Philippine history and cultures, her scholarly interests include theories of religion, histories and theories of the mass media, cultures of U.S. imperialism, and historical and ethnographic writing. Photograph by Bill Christian.

location

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  • Born: Germany
  • Based: Ann Arbor, MI, USA

comments

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Mediated Diasporas: Material Translations of the Philippines in a Globalized World

Deirdre McKay Mark Johnson

2011 Criticism 16 pages. Courtesy of IP Publishing.

South East Asia Research 19. 2 (2011): 181-196.

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Deirdre McKay

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Dr. McKay is a Senior Lecturer in Social Geography and Environmental Politics at Keele University. Previously she held appointments as a Postdoctoral Fellow and then Research Fellow in the School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University. McKay earned her B.A. (1st Hons) in Biology and Master's in Environmental Studies from Dalhousie University (Canada) and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. McKay's research draws on both social/cultural geography and social anthropology to explore people's place-based experiences of globalization and development. She is interested in the long-distance relations that connect outmigrants to their sending communities, changes in local livelihoods and the possibilities for locally sustainable, alternative economic development, and environmental degradation linked to migration. Dr. McKay does fieldwork in the global South and also with migrant communities from developing areas who have moved into the world's global cities. Much of her work has been conducted with people who originate in indigenous villages in the northern Philippines. Dr. McKay is the author of numerous articles, chapters, and edited collections. Her book, Global Filipinos: Migrants' Lives in the Virtual Village, was published in 2012 by Indiana University Press.

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Mark Johnson

b. 1963
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I was born in Oklahoma in 1963, but I spent most of my childhood in the Southern Philippines, living in Sulu and Zamboanga.  It is that early experience that underpins my continuing interest in and research about Filipino Muslims in particular.  After taking my first degree in California, I moved subsequently to the U.K. where I undertook postgraduate training, first in Archaeology and then Anthropology, at University College London.

My research interests and writing are focused broadly around the issues of gender/sexuality, landscape and material culture, movement and transnationalism. I have conducted ethnographic research in the Philippines, Vietnam, Costa Rica and, more recently, Saudi Arabia. My original research in the Philippines was concerned with gender and sexual diversity in the context of both real and imagined movements of people and the growth of ethno-nationalist discourse. Recent Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded research focused on the place of religion in the experiences of Filipino migrant workers in the Middle East and Saudi Arabia in particular.

Books

2011. Diasporic Journeys, Ritual, and Normativity among Asian Migrant Women. London: Routledge. (with Pnina Werbner, eds.)

1997. Beauty and Power:  Transgendering and Cultural Transformation in the Southern Philippines.  Oxford: Berg.

Edited Journal Issues

2012.  Queer Asian Subjects:  Transgressive Sexualities and Heteronormative Meanings.  Asian Studies Review 36(4) December. (with E. Blackwood, eds.)

2011. Mediated Diasporas: Material Translation of the Philippines in a Globalized World. South East Asia Research 19(2): 181-341. (with D. McKay, eds)

2010.  Diasporic Encounters, Sacred Journeys:  Ritual, Normativity and the Religious Imagination among International Asian Migrant Women. Special double issue of The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology11 (3-4): 205-448.  (with P. Werbner, eds.)

2000.  Gender and Sexual Diversity in East and South-East Asia. Culture, Health and Sexuality 2(4): 361-472. (with P. Jackson, eds.)

location

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  • Born: Oklahoma, USA
  • Based: Hull, England, UK

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contributor

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Deirdre McKay

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Dr. McKay is a Senior Lecturer in Social Geography and Environmental Politics at Keele University. Previously she held appointments as a Postdoctoral Fellow and then Research Fellow in the School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University. McKay earned her B.A. (1st Hons) in Biology and Master's in Environmental Studies from Dalhousie University (Canada) and a Ph.D. in Geography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. McKay's research draws on both social/cultural geography and social anthropology to explore people's place-based experiences of globalization and development. She is interested in the long-distance relations that connect outmigrants to their sending communities, changes in local livelihoods and the possibilities for locally sustainable, alternative economic development, and environmental degradation linked to migration. Dr. McKay does fieldwork in the global South and also with migrant communities from developing areas who have moved into the world's global cities. Much of her work has been conducted with people who originate in indigenous villages in the northern Philippines. Dr. McKay is the author of numerous articles, chapters, and edited collections. Her book, Global Filipinos: Migrants' Lives in the Virtual Village, was published in 2012 by Indiana University Press.

location

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  • Born: Halifax, Canada
  • Based: Keele, Staffordshire, England

comments

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Transpacific Femininities:The Making of the Modern Filipina

Denise Cruz

2012 Criticism 63 pages. Courtesy of Duke University Press.

Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina

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Denise Cruz

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I was born in Los Angeles, CA, and grew up in various locations in Southern (Orange County) and Northern (the Bay) California. After receiving my B.A. in English from the University of California, Los Angeles, I worked as a community educator in San Francisco before returning to UCLA for graduate studies. Before moving to the English department at the University of Toronto, I was an assistant professor of English and American Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington.

In my published and current research, I use spatial and geographic formations (from the transpacific, to the regional, to the Global South) to examine previously unstudied archives (from the first works of English literature by Filipina and Filipino authors, to private papers that document connections between the Midwest and U.S. empire, to fashion shows in Manila). I contend that this combined analytical and archival approach extends our understanding of the importance of national, regional, transnational, and global dynamics in the United States, the Philippines, and Asia. As a feminist scholar, I am especially interested in examining how these interactions have historically impacted and continue to influence constructions of gender and sexuality. My first book, Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina (Duke University Press, 2012), analyzed connections between the rise of Philippine print culture in English and the emergence of new classes of transpacific women from the early to the mid-twentieth century. I claim that this period was dominated by a fascination with transpacific Asian women—figures who were connected to both nationalist movements in Asia and the global women's suffrage movement. While Transpacific Femininities centers on Filipina and Filipino literature and culture, ultimately, the book tracks geopolitical transitions and presents a new way of thinking about gendered productions, space, and constructions of a feminized Asia. I am currently working on two book projects: a study of Philippine global couture and its connections to the Global South, and an analysis of the importance of regions and regionalism to Asian America. Fueled by my research, my courses complicate the geographic, chronological, and disciplinary parameters that shape the study of twentieth and twenty-first century American, ethnic American, Asian American, and Philippine literature and culture.

location

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  • Born: Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • Based: Toronto, ON, Canada

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contributor

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Dr. Jonathan Corpus Ong

b. 1981
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Dr. Jonathan Corpus Ong is Assistant Professor in Sociology at Hong Kong Baptist University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Cambridge in 2011. Jonathan has published his work on media and migration, media ethics, and mediated political participation in Media, Culture & Society, Television & New Media, and Communication, Culture & Critique. He was the first Graduate Student Representative of the Popular Communication Division of the International Communication Association. His first book The Poverty of Television is forthcoming from Anthem Press. In July 2013, he joins the University of Leicester (UK) as Lecturer in Media and Communications.

location

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  • Born: Manila, Philippines
  • Based: Hong Kong, China

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contributor

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Dr. Jonathan Corpus Ong

b. 1981
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Dr. Jonathan Corpus Ong is Assistant Professor in Sociology at Hong Kong Baptist University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Cambridge in 2011. Jonathan has published his work on media and migration, media ethics, and mediated political participation in Media, Culture & Society, Television & New Media, and Communication, Culture & Critique. He was the first Graduate Student Representative of the Popular Communication Division of the International Communication Association. His first book The Poverty of Television is forthcoming from Anthem Press. In July 2013, he joins the University of Leicester (UK) as Lecturer in Media and Communications.

contributor

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Jason Vincent A. Cabañes

b. 1981

Jason was born in 1981, in Quezon City, The Philippines. He is presently a final year Institute of Communication Studies  Ph.D. Scholar at the University of Leeds, UK; he is also a Lecturer in Media Studies and the Program Coordinator of the Master’s in  Journalism program at the Department of Communication, Ateneo de Manila University, The Philippines. He was previously an Association of Southeast Asian Nations Research Fellow at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore and a consultant of the Communication for Governance and Accountability Program of The World Bank. His scholarly works include articles in the internationally peer-reviewed journals Media, Culture and Society (forthcoming), New Media and Society, and Southeast Asia Research; an entry in the Encyclopaedia of Social Networking; and a chapter in the book Changing Media, Changing Societies (Asian Media Information and Communication Centre, 2009). His present research interests are on social and mediational approaches to migration, multiculturalism, and politics.

location

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  • Born: Quezon City, Philippines
  • Based: Leeds, England, UK

comments

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