Kimberley Acebo Arteche
Curated Exhibition

Hidden

This group exhibition showcases material, bodily, and sensorial artwork and literature that make varied attempts at concealment. Left: Kimberley Acebo Arteche, “Ta, Too Project 03,” 2014.

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Artist spotlight

Kenneth Tam

What's in the box? Watch Tam's video The Compression Is Not Subservient to the Explosion; It Gives It Increased Force.

Poet Spotlight

baRbRa

baRbRa is a writer, transnational feminist, and Los Angeles, California, native. She is the National Communications Director of the grassroots women’s organization AF3IRM. She says: "I write because I choose not to forget."

Offline Exhibition

Queer Sights and Sounds

CA+T's first offline exhibition! Now until November 1, 2014, in Riverside, California.

curated exhibition

Hidden

The virtual exhibition Hidden showcases a range of material, bodily, and sensorial artwork and literature that are tied to each other by their varied attempts at concealment. We associate the word “hidden” with bodies or objects that cannot be seen—things out of sight and perhaps out of mind. But each of these works visually or viscerally transmits the sense that there are mysterious presences hidden or in hiding. 
 
These works invite us to tease out the details and structures that have facilitated their concealment. What is purportedly hidden then emerges in plain sight. Collectively, the works in Hidden capture “absent presences.” 
 
During the conceptual stages of Hidden, I was influenced by stories of the undocumented in the United States, and I thought about my own family’s connection to this issue. I grew up abroad, and the knowledge that some family members were “TNT” an acronym for tago ng tago or “undocumented migrants” in the United States was always present in our household. Their stories and their existence were known to all of us, but they remained hidden from society writ large. 
 
Only later did I realize that their presence and visibility in our lives came with tremendous stakes. If caught as undocumented, they could have been detained or deported back to the Philippines. When I read about the undocumented, I think about my relatives and how their lives connect to other bodies, communities, spaces, feelings, and survival strategies.
 
I hope that Hidden helps to answer questions that continue to linger: What does it mean to be hidden? What forces govern the in/visibility of people or spaces? How do artists and writers conceptualize the spectral, both phantasms and memories?
 
Curated by Jan Christian Bernabe 
September 2014
 
Special thanks to my curatorial assistant intern: Tanya Tran
 
Over the course of several weeks, work from the following artists and writers will unfold on CA+T’s website. Maraming salamat to all the contributors to Hidden.
 
Kimberly Arteche, Lek Borja, Marylene Camacho, Carina A. del Rosario, John Yoyogi Fortes, Mik Gaspay, Luisa A. Igloria, Farsad Labbauf, Lin + Lam, Kang Seung Lee, Jessica Lichtenstein, Senalka McDonald,  Michelle Peñaloza, Barbra Ramos, Chris Sicat, Jeffrey Augustine Songco, Laura Swanson, Kenneth Tam, Maria Villote
 
Hidden was made possible through the generous support of donors.
 

Ta, Too Project 01

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

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Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
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Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

location

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  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

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Ta, Too Project 03

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

contributor

X

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
image description
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Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

location

X
  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

comments

X

Ta, Too Project 04

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

2014 Lightbox installation. 18 in. x 24 in. x 3 in. Courtesy of the artist.

contributor

X

Kimberley Acebo Arteche

b. 1987
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Born in Silver Spring, Maryland, Kimberley was raised in the suburbs of the Metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts and Photography from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. During college, she was heavily involved with the Filipino American Student Association at UMBC and served as National Director and District VI Chair for Filipino Intercollegiate Networking Dialogue (F.I.N.D.). She was also a Principal dancer and Director of Operations for the 501(c)3 non-profit organization, Culture Shock Washington, D.C. She has worked with several arts youth and community outreach programs, including Banner Neighborhoods, Sitar Arts Center, and So Others Might Eat ( S.O.M.E.). Kimberley also recently served as Executive Producer for the 2013 International Choreographer’s Showcase held in Washington, D.C.

Kimberley currently resides in Daly City, California and is pursuing her M.F.A. in Art at San Francisco State University. She is the recipient of the 2014 Sher-Right Scholarship and 2014 Jack and Gertrude Murphy Award, administered by The San Francisco Foundation. She will be showing in an exhibition of the Murphy and Cadogan awardees at the SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, California, opening on September 3, 2014.

 

Photograph by Joseph Mintz. 

This series of self-portrait installations is in dialogue with Carlos Villa's "Tat2" pieces that appropriated Maori facial tattoo traditions to explore his identity as a Filipino American in the 1970s. Villa’s appropriation of Maori tattooing was a reflection on the inaccessibility to information of Filipino Art History and Indigenous Filipino traditions.

Considering how technology and the Internet has aided my search for self and placing myself within today’s ethnic and cultural landscape, I manipulate and construct images through digital processes that allow me to explore the complex burden in our relationships with images and identity.

Through research of Wang Od, the last Philippine headhunting tattoo artist, and traditional Kalinga tattooing traditions in women, I continue Villa’s exploration of identity, opening a critical discussion on how information and images have been embedded into our bodies, and how our image-informed identities are then performed in our everyday lives.

location

X
  • Born: Silver Spring, MD, USA
  • Based: Daly City, CA, USA

comments

X

Spring (Four Seasons Series), detail

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

contributor

X

Jessica Lichtenstein

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Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

location

X
  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

comments

X

Spring (Four Seasons Series)

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

contributor

X

Jessica Lichtenstein

image description
  • See All Works
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  • visit website

Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

location

X
  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

comments

X

Summer (Four Seasons Series), detail

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

contributor

X

Jessica Lichtenstein

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

location

X
  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

comments

X

Summer (Four Seasons Series)

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

contributor

X

Jessica Lichtenstein

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

location

X
  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

comments

X

Fall (Four Seasons Series), detail

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

contributor

X

Jessica Lichtenstein

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

location

X
  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

comments

X

Fall (Four Seasons Series)

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

contributor

X

Jessica Lichtenstein

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

location

X
  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

comments

X

Winter (Four Seasons Series), detail

Jessica Lichtenstein

2014 C-print on acrylic. 48 in. x 48 in. x 2 in. Courtesy of gallery nine5.

contributor

X

Jessica Lichtenstein

image description
  • See All Works
  • facebook
  • visit website

Looking to the classical nude form as inspiration, Jessica Lichtenstein explores modern international reinterpretations of female depictions. Beginning her career with placing hyper-sexualized Japanese figurines into domesticated environments, Lichtenstein’s exploration into the female form has since evolved to incorporate glimpses of female sexuality in textiles, furniture, acrylic prints, mirrors, and chrome. Pulling viewers into her utopian, phantasmagoric worlds, Lichtenstein asks her viewers, male and female alike, to re-consider the many complexities of femininity.

Her latest series departs from the overt sexuality of Japanese anime culture and investigates the simultaneous anonymity and specificity of female characteristics. The faceless, repeating effeminate forms represent both the community of women in the world and the individuated characteristics that make up a single woman. Varied body positions differentiate each figure and yet harmoniously contribute to the texture of the leafy, vibrant tree that unifies them.

The unique shape of the works, whether in Lichtenstein’s famed word pieces or the circles of her Four Seasons Series, enhances and contains the meaning within. Words and shapes inform and define the worlds inside, lush and inviting and ripe with intricacy.

Jessica Lichtenstein was born in New York and attended Yale University, studying under renowned art critic Vincent Scully. Her work spans multiple mediums, including furniture, textiles, photography, prints, and sculptures. Her pieces are held in prominent international collections in Paris, France; London, England; Saudi Arabia; Jordan; Chicago, IL; Palm Beach and Beverly Hills, CA; and New York, NY; including in the private collection of Lizzie Tisch and high-end designer boutique Suite 1521. She has exhibited extensively in New York, participating in art shows Scope, Art Southampton, and Art Miami.

Recently I’ve become fascinated by the idea that we are all fledgling buds, blooming from a tree, reaching towards the sky and trying to grow and evolve. But we all have different journeys. Some of us cling to the tree for support, others leap or jump from the tree freely; some find their comfort in the shade of their companions, while others gain confidence from their solitude; some are extroverts flaunting their sexuality, while others like to hide in the shadows. To me the combination of every girl on the tree represents the huge range of human experience and emotions, and more specifically the gamut of emotions that accompany being a female in a world based on perfection, beauty, and transience. They are all ornamental flowers, figuring out their paths through life, growing, falling, jumping, evolving, teetering on the edge, yet they are simultaneously being judged, critiqued, loved, and worshipped by the outside world who, like the viewer, closely examines and gazes upon them through a thick circular lens.

location

X
  • Born: New York, NY, USA
  • Based: New York, NY, USA

comments

X