Greyson Hong
Curated Exhibition

Queer Horizons

The show insists on claiming liminal and hybrid spaces and lives, queer collectivity, and intersectional solidarity. Left: Greyson Hong, “Pool” (2010).

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curated exhibition

Queer Horizons

Queer Horizons features the work of Asian American and Asian diasporic artists whose work envisions a queer future that unsettles the past, disrupts the present, and imagines new worlds beyond the limits of the horizon.

 

We take inspiration from José Esteban Muñoz, the late queer studies scholar, and his conception of a “not yet here.” As he explains in Cruising Utopia, the “not yet here” is a phenomenon of queer futurity that “allows us to see and feel beyond the quagmire of the present.”

 

Within the last ten years in the US, we have celebrated the legal recognition of same-sex marriage, the end of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and the formal acceptance of gays in the military, and increased visibility of LGBTQ bodies and personalities in popular culture. In our present moment, however, LGBTQ rights, safety, and health care are increasingly under threat. Simultaneously, the current administration frames Asian American communities as “un-American,” the after tremors along old Yellow Peril fault lines. They are foreign, unassimilable, undocumented: Muslim “terrorists,” hordes of H1B visa techie taking over American jobs, or “model minority” students taking up too much space in classrooms.

 

However, the artists and works in Queer Horizons name a possibility beyond the "model minority”: as queer Asian American artists, they disrupt the model minority narrative defined by heteronormative notions of success. Each artist engages a non-linear temporality moving between pasts, presents, and futures, and each work gestures towards a queer history that we, as Queer Asian Americans, can excavate, (re)create, and (re)produce in our pasts, presents, and futures. For example, Greyson Hong's Costco photos, Việt Lê's productions of club scenes/ online performances, and Tina Takemoto's unconventional short film all tell of an alternative past to inform a queer alternative future. As we think of these experiences at the intersections with undocumented status, foreignness, and Islamophobia, their highly experimental and queer aesthetic in storytelling suggests further radical potential.

 

It is in this dangerous political climate that the artists in Queer Horizons insist on claiming liminal and hybrid spaces and lives, queer collectivity, and intersectional solidarity. Embracing failure, misbehavior, non-normativity, and defiant joyfulness thus becomes a radical form of resistance. This is the kind of utopian horizon that we call forward. In the spirit of artist Jeffrey Augustine Songco’s video, “Let’s Dance America!”

 

Queer Horizons appears in conjunction with the publication of Laura Kina and Jan Christian Bernabe’s book, Queering Contemporary Asian American Art (University of Washington Press, 2017). http://www.queeringcontemporaryasianamericanart.com/

 

Curated by Jan Christian Bernabe and Laura Kina

 

Curatorial Assistant: Mads Le

 

Contributors: Anida Yoeu Ali, Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik, Kim Anno, Wafaa Bilal, Greyson Hong, Kiam Marcelo Junio, Việt Lê, Maya Mackrandilal, Zavé Martohardjono, Jeffrey Augustine Songco, Tina Takemoto, and Saya Woolfalk.

 

Contributors’ works are published in staggered waves from late-June to late-July 2017, after which the whole exhibition are archived permanently on CA+T’s website.

 

Special thanks to the Andy Warhol Foundation and the California Institute of Contemporary Arts for fiscal support.

 

Summer 2017

The Red Chador: Threshold

Anida Yoeu Ali

2016 Archival Ink Jet Print Courtesy of Studio Revolt Photographer: Les Talusan

contributor

X

Anida Yoeu Ali

b. 1974

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s practice spans performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual, and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. In 2015, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Her work is exhibited internationally, most notably with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, a trans-nomadic artist-run media lab whose controversial works on deportation have caused White House interns to be fired. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington, Bothell where she teaches art, performance, and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma and spends much of her time working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US!

My artistic vision requires an element of risk and belief that performance art, humor, and religion can fuse conceptually and aesthetically. Through an interdisciplinary approach, my work maps new political and spiritual landscapes. Often meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphorical device for stories to spread across an expanse.

In The Red Chador: Threshold, performed in Washington, DC, I pose the question: Can we accept a Muslim woman as an American patriot? The Red Chador: Threshold was a commissioned performance for Crosslines Culture Lab and hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Covered from head to toe in a red sequined chador, I sat, stood, and walked silently around for eight hours over three days during Memorial weekend. For me, The Red Chador embodies how the mere existence of a Muslim woman can be misinterpreted in an era of heightened Islamophobia. For two days, I was installed in the building’s rotunda, where the Statue of America stood over a century ago at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building. Ninety-nine American flags as well as ninety-nine white flags printed with Salaam—Arabic for peace—surrounded me, challenging the idea that my Muslim and American identities are at odds. On Memorial Day, I took The Red Chador out to the streets of [Washington,] DC, walking amongst the everyday people at famous historical sites and memorials. Concurrent to my appearance, the Rolling Thunder annual motorcycle rally of veterans also rolled into town. Since 2015, The Red Chador has appeared in Paris, Hartford, CT; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Hong Kong.

location

X
  • Born: Cambodia
  • Based: Tacoma, WA, USA
  • Also Based in: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

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The Red Chador: Threshold / Triptych

Anida Yoeu Ali

2016 Wall Mural 9' x 11' Courtesy of Studio Revolt Photographer: Les Talusan

contributor

X

Anida Yoeu Ali

b. 1974

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s practice spans performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual, and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. In 2015, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Her work is exhibited internationally, most notably with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, a trans-nomadic artist-run media lab whose controversial works on deportation have caused White House interns to be fired. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington, Bothell where she teaches art, performance, and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma and spends much of her time working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US!

My artistic vision requires an element of risk and belief that performance art, humor, and religion can fuse conceptually and aesthetically. Through an interdisciplinary approach, my work maps new political and spiritual landscapes. Often meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphorical device for stories to spread across an expanse.

In The Red Chador: Threshold, performed in Washington, DC, I pose the question: Can we accept a Muslim woman as an American patriot? The Red Chador: Threshold was a commissioned performance for Crosslines Culture Lab and hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Covered from head to toe in a red sequined chador, I sat, stood, and walked silently around for eight hours over three days during Memorial weekend. For me, The Red Chador embodies how the mere existence of a Muslim woman can be misinterpreted in an era of heightened Islamophobia. For two days, I was installed in the building’s rotunda, where the Statue of America stood over a century ago at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building. Ninety-nine American flags as well as ninety-nine white flags printed with Salaam—Arabic for peace—surrounded me, challenging the idea that my Muslim and American identities are at odds. On Memorial Day, I took The Red Chador out to the streets of [Washington,] DC, walking amongst the everyday people at famous historical sites and memorials. Concurrent to my appearance, the Rolling Thunder annual motorcycle rally of veterans also rolled into town. Since 2015, The Red Chador has appeared in Paris, Hartford, CT; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Hong Kong.

location

X
  • Born: Cambodia
  • Based: Tacoma, WA, USA
  • Also Based in: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

X

The Red Chador: Threshold

Anida Yoeu Ali

2016 Vinyl Window Mural 188.75” x 89” Courtesy of Studio Revolt Photographer: Masahiro Sugano

contributor

X

Anida Yoeu Ali

b. 1974

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist, educator and global agitator. Ali’s practice spans performance, installation, videos, images, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art-making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual, and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. In 2015, Ali won the top prize of the Sovereign Art Prize, Hong Kong. Her work is exhibited internationally, most notably with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, 5th Fukuoka Asian Art Triennial, Lyon Museum of Contemporary Art, Palais de Tokyo, and the Asia Pacific Triennial 8. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, a trans-nomadic artist-run media lab whose controversial works on deportation have caused White House interns to be fired. Ali earned her B.F.A. from University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) and an M.F.A. from School of the Art Institute Chicago. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at the University of Washington, Bothell where she teaches art, performance, and global studies courses. Ali resides in Tacoma and spends much of her time working between the Asia-Pacific region and the US!

My artistic vision requires an element of risk and belief that performance art, humor, and religion can fuse conceptually and aesthetically. Through an interdisciplinary approach, my work maps new political and spiritual landscapes. Often meters and meters of textile act as skin, as a way for the surface of my body to extend into public spaces, and as a metaphorical device for stories to spread across an expanse.

In The Red Chador: Threshold, performed in Washington, DC, I pose the question: Can we accept a Muslim woman as an American patriot? The Red Chador: Threshold was a commissioned performance for Crosslines Culture Lab and hosted by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. Covered from head to toe in a red sequined chador, I sat, stood, and walked silently around for eight hours over three days during Memorial weekend. For me, The Red Chador embodies how the mere existence of a Muslim woman can be misinterpreted in an era of heightened Islamophobia. For two days, I was installed in the building’s rotunda, where the Statue of America stood over a century ago at the Smithsonian Arts and Industries Building. Ninety-nine American flags as well as ninety-nine white flags printed with Salaam—Arabic for peace—surrounded me, challenging the idea that my Muslim and American identities are at odds. On Memorial Day, I took The Red Chador out to the streets of [Washington,] DC, walking amongst the everyday people at famous historical sites and memorials. Concurrent to my appearance, the Rolling Thunder annual motorcycle rally of veterans also rolled into town. Since 2015, The Red Chador has appeared in Paris, Hartford, CT; San Francisco, CA; Seattle, WA; Washington, DC; and Hong Kong.

location

X
  • Born: Cambodia
  • Based: Tacoma, WA, USA
  • Also Based in: Chicago, IL, USA

comments

X

Valley Curtain

Kim Anno

2017 Oil on wood 41" x 33" Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Kim Anno

b. 1958
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Kim Anno is a painter, photographer, book artist, and filmmaker/video artist whose work has been exhibited by museums nationally and internationally. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Brooklyn Museum, Honolulu Museum, Berkeley Art Museum, Crocker Museum, Oakland Museum, Getty Research Institute, Columbia University, University of Texas, Austin, Walker Museum, Koopman Collection, The Hague, and Newberry Library all include her work.

Anno’s works include films and staged readings. Her documentary, A New World (2016), focuses on the education and triumph of young African American women at North Carolina’s Bennett College. In 2016, she directed Crisis, a live staged reading in collaboration with Brazilian composer Saulo Laudares, of her adaptation of Dante’s Purgatorio (Canto 32), as well as a live contemporary dance performance, Drought 1200, presented in San Francisco. Currently Anno is making two films in South Florida and Cuba. The first is 90 Miles from Paradise, a project staged in Havana, Key West, and Miami. The second film, ¡Quba!, is a documentary on the LGBTQI community in Cuba, and she recently licensed four original Cuban bands’ songs for the film. For the Oakland Asian Cultural Center’s 2017-18 season, Anno is producing a film/live music performance concert. Anno’s films have been screened internationally at festivals and venues including the Museum of Modern Art, Rio De Janeiro; the 14th Annual New Media Festival, Seoul, Korea; Goethe Institute, Johannesburg; Durban Municipal Gallery in the Don’t Panic Exhibition; San Francisco Asian Art Museum; Site Santa Fe Biennale; One Night Stand, New Mexico; the King’s Art Center; Kim Anno Retrospective; the Varnosi Museum, Hungary; DC Dusseldorf International Expo, Germany; Pulse, Miami; the Berkeley Art Museum; the Denison University Museum; and Noel Art Museum.

Her work is also featured in a number of exhibitions and magazines. She has a solo exhibition and screening in Atlanta, at Marcia Wood Gallery, and in 2018 she will have a solo exhibition at the University of Suffolk in England. Her work is featured in the June 2017 issue of Area Paris, an arts magazine. More of her work will be published in Saint Anne’s Review (Spring 2017).

Anno is the recipient of a number of awards and fellowships: the Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation Award, the Eureka Foundation’s Fleishhaker Fellowship (2003), the Zellerbach Foundation (2010-12), the Open Circle Foundation (2013), and a Sustainable Arts residency at Kala Art Institute. In fall 2014 Anno was a recipient of a Berkeley Film Foundation Award and published her second artist’s book with the poet Anne Carson, titled The Albertine Work Out. In 2015, she received the Kala Art Institute’s master artist award. She has published photography covers, photo essays, and Purgatorio text in Art Papers National Magazine (Fall 2016). She contributed to an essay on the artist David Hammons for Flash Art Magazine and to Queering Contemporary Asian Art (2017), edited by Laura Kina, and Jan Christian Bernabe. Anno also published a photograph in Harper’s Magazine in 2013.

Anno has been at work on an epic social practice filmmaking project: Men and Women in Water Cities, a longer term work made with local actors, citizens in coastal communities who are grappling with sea level rise. Recently, she founded the non-profit Wild Projects. Its mission is to “collaborate with communities world wide through fearless art, film, and performance productions that inspire resiliency in the face of adversity.”

You can also find her work at Marciawoodgallery.com.

location

X
  • Born: Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • Based: Berkeley, CA, USA

comments

X

Kyoto

Kim Anno

2013 Oil on wood and canvas 48" x 84" Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Kim Anno

b. 1958
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Kim Anno is a painter, photographer, book artist, and filmmaker/video artist whose work has been exhibited by museums nationally and internationally. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Brooklyn Museum, Honolulu Museum, Berkeley Art Museum, Crocker Museum, Oakland Museum, Getty Research Institute, Columbia University, University of Texas, Austin, Walker Museum, Koopman Collection, The Hague, and Newberry Library all include her work.

Anno’s works include films and staged readings. Her documentary, A New World (2016), focuses on the education and triumph of young African American women at North Carolina’s Bennett College. In 2016, she directed Crisis, a live staged reading in collaboration with Brazilian composer Saulo Laudares, of her adaptation of Dante’s Purgatorio (Canto 32), as well as a live contemporary dance performance, Drought 1200, presented in San Francisco. Currently Anno is making two films in South Florida and Cuba. The first is 90 Miles from Paradise, a project staged in Havana, Key West, and Miami. The second film, ¡Quba!, is a documentary on the LGBTQI community in Cuba, and she recently licensed four original Cuban bands’ songs for the film. For the Oakland Asian Cultural Center’s 2017-18 season, Anno is producing a film/live music performance concert. Anno’s films have been screened internationally at festivals and venues including the Museum of Modern Art, Rio De Janeiro; the 14th Annual New Media Festival, Seoul, Korea; Goethe Institute, Johannesburg; Durban Municipal Gallery in the Don’t Panic Exhibition; San Francisco Asian Art Museum; Site Santa Fe Biennale; One Night Stand, New Mexico; the King’s Art Center; Kim Anno Retrospective; the Varnosi Museum, Hungary; DC Dusseldorf International Expo, Germany; Pulse, Miami; the Berkeley Art Museum; the Denison University Museum; and Noel Art Museum.

Her work is also featured in a number of exhibitions and magazines. She has a solo exhibition and screening in Atlanta, at Marcia Wood Gallery, and in 2018 she will have a solo exhibition at the University of Suffolk in England. Her work is featured in the June 2017 issue of Area Paris, an arts magazine. More of her work will be published in Saint Anne’s Review (Spring 2017).

Anno is the recipient of a number of awards and fellowships: the Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation Award, the Eureka Foundation’s Fleishhaker Fellowship (2003), the Zellerbach Foundation (2010-12), the Open Circle Foundation (2013), and a Sustainable Arts residency at Kala Art Institute. In fall 2014 Anno was a recipient of a Berkeley Film Foundation Award and published her second artist’s book with the poet Anne Carson, titled The Albertine Work Out. In 2015, she received the Kala Art Institute’s master artist award. She has published photography covers, photo essays, and Purgatorio text in Art Papers National Magazine (Fall 2016). She contributed to an essay on the artist David Hammons for Flash Art Magazine and to Queering Contemporary Asian Art (2017), edited by Laura Kina, and Jan Christian Bernabe. Anno also published a photograph in Harper’s Magazine in 2013.

Anno has been at work on an epic social practice filmmaking project: Men and Women in Water Cities, a longer term work made with local actors, citizens in coastal communities who are grappling with sea level rise. Recently, she founded the non-profit Wild Projects. Its mission is to “collaborate with communities world wide through fearless art, film, and performance productions that inspire resiliency in the face of adversity.”

You can also find her work at Marciawoodgallery.com.

location

X
  • Born: Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • Based: Berkeley, CA, USA

comments

X

Horizon

Kim Anno

2014 Oil and silkscreen on aluminum 56" x 74" Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Kim Anno

b. 1958
image description
  • See All Works
  • visit website

Kim Anno is a painter, photographer, book artist, and filmmaker/video artist whose work has been exhibited by museums nationally and internationally. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Brooklyn Museum, Honolulu Museum, Berkeley Art Museum, Crocker Museum, Oakland Museum, Getty Research Institute, Columbia University, University of Texas, Austin, Walker Museum, Koopman Collection, The Hague, and Newberry Library all include her work.

Anno’s works include films and staged readings. Her documentary, A New World (2016), focuses on the education and triumph of young African American women at North Carolina’s Bennett College. In 2016, she directed Crisis, a live staged reading in collaboration with Brazilian composer Saulo Laudares, of her adaptation of Dante’s Purgatorio (Canto 32), as well as a live contemporary dance performance, Drought 1200, presented in San Francisco. Currently Anno is making two films in South Florida and Cuba. The first is 90 Miles from Paradise, a project staged in Havana, Key West, and Miami. The second film, ¡Quba!, is a documentary on the LGBTQI community in Cuba, and she recently licensed four original Cuban bands’ songs for the film. For the Oakland Asian Cultural Center’s 2017-18 season, Anno is producing a film/live music performance concert. Anno’s films have been screened internationally at festivals and venues including the Museum of Modern Art, Rio De Janeiro; the 14th Annual New Media Festival, Seoul, Korea; Goethe Institute, Johannesburg; Durban Municipal Gallery in the Don’t Panic Exhibition; San Francisco Asian Art Museum; Site Santa Fe Biennale; One Night Stand, New Mexico; the King’s Art Center; Kim Anno Retrospective; the Varnosi Museum, Hungary; DC Dusseldorf International Expo, Germany; Pulse, Miami; the Berkeley Art Museum; the Denison University Museum; and Noel Art Museum.

Her work is also featured in a number of exhibitions and magazines. She has a solo exhibition and screening in Atlanta, at Marcia Wood Gallery, and in 2018 she will have a solo exhibition at the University of Suffolk in England. Her work is featured in the June 2017 issue of Area Paris, an arts magazine. More of her work will be published in Saint Anne’s Review (Spring 2017).

Anno is the recipient of a number of awards and fellowships: the Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation Award, the Eureka Foundation’s Fleishhaker Fellowship (2003), the Zellerbach Foundation (2010-12), the Open Circle Foundation (2013), and a Sustainable Arts residency at Kala Art Institute. In fall 2014 Anno was a recipient of a Berkeley Film Foundation Award and published her second artist’s book with the poet Anne Carson, titled The Albertine Work Out. In 2015, she received the Kala Art Institute’s master artist award. She has published photography covers, photo essays, and Purgatorio text in Art Papers National Magazine (Fall 2016). She contributed to an essay on the artist David Hammons for Flash Art Magazine and to Queering Contemporary Asian Art (2017), edited by Laura Kina, and Jan Christian Bernabe. Anno also published a photograph in Harper’s Magazine in 2013.

Anno has been at work on an epic social practice filmmaking project: Men and Women in Water Cities, a longer term work made with local actors, citizens in coastal communities who are grappling with sea level rise. Recently, she founded the non-profit Wild Projects. Its mission is to “collaborate with communities world wide through fearless art, film, and performance productions that inspire resiliency in the face of adversity.”

You can also find her work at Marciawoodgallery.com.

location

X
  • Born: Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • Based: Berkeley, CA, USA

comments

X

Pool

Greyson Hong

2010 Large scale floor to ceiling projection Duration: 6 min 14 sec (looped) Courtesy of the artist

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X

Greyson Hong

b. 1982
image description
  • See All Works

Greyson Hong received her M.F.A. in film and video from Bard College (2014) and her B.F.A. in studio art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2007). She was born in Chicago, IL, and lives in New Haven, CT, where she teaches video at the Educational Center for the Arts and Gateway Community College. She also studied at the Summer Studio Program at Oxbow School of Art (2004), with a concentration in Glass and Sculpture, and the United States Naval Academy (2002), with a concentration in Chemistry and Mathematics. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at Artspace New Haven.

Greyson Hong is a new media and performance artist whose work explores memory, loss, personal histories, narrative form, displacement, and the body. Her work pulls from personal experiences to contemplate the choreographies of space, trained bodies, and the way we use non-verbal language to communicate via sound, light, and gesture. Her recent work attempts to imagine impossible realities of the queer gendered body. In Costco Photo Repair, she hires Costco to digitally re-gender her childhood photographs. The center photo of each triptych presents the in-between stage, introducing a third space beyond the gender binary.

location

X
  • Born: Chicago, IL, USA
  • Based: New Haven, CT, USA

comments

X

Pool (screen capture)

Greyson Hong

2010 Screen capture of video performance Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Greyson Hong

b. 1982
image description
  • See All Works

Greyson Hong received her M.F.A. in film and video from Bard College (2014) and her B.F.A. in studio art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2007). She was born in Chicago, IL, and lives in New Haven, CT, where she teaches video at the Educational Center for the Arts and Gateway Community College. She also studied at the Summer Studio Program at Oxbow School of Art (2004), with a concentration in Glass and Sculpture, and the United States Naval Academy (2002), with a concentration in Chemistry and Mathematics. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at Artspace New Haven.

Greyson Hong is a new media and performance artist whose work explores memory, loss, personal histories, narrative form, displacement, and the body. Her work pulls from personal experiences to contemplate the choreographies of space, trained bodies, and the way we use non-verbal language to communicate via sound, light, and gesture. Her recent work attempts to imagine impossible realities of the queer gendered body. In Costco Photo Repair, she hires Costco to digitally re-gender her childhood photographs. The center photo of each triptych presents the in-between stage, introducing a third space beyond the gender binary.

location

X
  • Born: Chicago, IL, USA
  • Based: New Haven, CT, USA

comments

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Salpuri

Greyson Hong

2012 Single channel video Duration: 10 min 30 sec (silent looped) Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Greyson Hong

b. 1982
image description
  • See All Works

Greyson Hong received her M.F.A. in film and video from Bard College (2014) and her B.F.A. in studio art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2007). She was born in Chicago, IL, and lives in New Haven, CT, where she teaches video at the Educational Center for the Arts and Gateway Community College. She also studied at the Summer Studio Program at Oxbow School of Art (2004), with a concentration in Glass and Sculpture, and the United States Naval Academy (2002), with a concentration in Chemistry and Mathematics. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at Artspace New Haven.

Greyson Hong is a new media and performance artist whose work explores memory, loss, personal histories, narrative form, displacement, and the body. Her work pulls from personal experiences to contemplate the choreographies of space, trained bodies, and the way we use non-verbal language to communicate via sound, light, and gesture. Her recent work attempts to imagine impossible realities of the queer gendered body. In Costco Photo Repair, she hires Costco to digitally re-gender her childhood photographs. The center photo of each triptych presents the in-between stage, introducing a third space beyond the gender binary.

location

X
  • Born: Chicago, IL, USA
  • Based: New Haven, CT, USA

comments

X

Salpuri (screen capture)

Greyson Hong

2012 Screen capture of video performance Courtesy of the artist

contributor

X

Greyson Hong

b. 1982
image description
  • See All Works

Greyson Hong received her M.F.A. in film and video from Bard College (2014) and her B.F.A. in studio art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2007). She was born in Chicago, IL, and lives in New Haven, CT, where she teaches video at the Educational Center for the Arts and Gateway Community College. She also studied at the Summer Studio Program at Oxbow School of Art (2004), with a concentration in Glass and Sculpture, and the United States Naval Academy (2002), with a concentration in Chemistry and Mathematics. She is currently the Artist-in-Residence at Artspace New Haven.

Greyson Hong is a new media and performance artist whose work explores memory, loss, personal histories, narrative form, displacement, and the body. Her work pulls from personal experiences to contemplate the choreographies of space, trained bodies, and the way we use non-verbal language to communicate via sound, light, and gesture. Her recent work attempts to imagine impossible realities of the queer gendered body. In Costco Photo Repair, she hires Costco to digitally re-gender her childhood photographs. The center photo of each triptych presents the in-between stage, introducing a third space beyond the gender binary.

location

X
  • Born: Chicago, IL, USA
  • Based: New Haven, CT, USA

comments

X